28 June 2022 The Future is the Product of the Past

The rich-poor distinction draws attention in the nutrition of the inhabitants of the Ancient City of Pergamon

The hegemony of wealth to the poor, arising from the ruler, elite structure, property ownership, unjust acquisition, and distribution of resources, which began to be seen with the transition to settled life, became more evident in the Ancient Age.

The structure, which constitutes the political and economic structure of the Roman Empire, separated people with a sharp line within the society. The citizen Roman was always advantageous over the individual belonging to the other lower class. This sharpness was not only seen in the lower part but even in itself. Even the diet of the wealthy Roman is a phenomenon that shows this sharpness.

Nutrition of the people of the Ancient City of Pergamon helps distinguish the rich from the poor

Research on the skeletons unearthed in the ongoing excavations in the Ancient City of Bergama, which is on the UNESCO World Heritage List, helps to understand the health conditions, diseases, and eating habits of the city people.

Professor Wolf Rüdiger Teegen, Specialist in Prehistoric Protohistory and Roman Archeology at Ludwig Maximilians University in Munich, conducts research on the nutrition of ancient people. Photo: AA
Professor Wolf Rüdiger Teegen, Specialist in Prehistoric Protohistory and Roman Archeology at Ludwig Maximilians University in Munich, conducts research on the nutrition of ancient people. Photo: AA

Working on the skeletons unearthed from 2 necropolises in the ancient city, also known as Pergamon, Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich, Prehistoric Protohistoric and Roman Archeology Specialist Prof. Dr. Wolf Rüdiger Teegen’s international articles also give clues about the dietary habits and diseases of the ancients.

Professor Wolf Rüdiger Teegen told Anadolu Agency (AA) that he has been working on fossil and bone remains andIn this context, he said that he has been in Bergama for about 11 years.

Explaining that they conducted research on 300 skeletons and bone remains in the region, Teegen said that their work also covered the Roman and Byzantine periods.

Teegen stated that they primarily focused on “gender” and “age” in their reviews:  “In some skeletons, it is impossible to determine gender. Age determination is much more possible. We see a typical age distribution. This is also true for Roman and Hellenistic times.

Photo: AA

We found that people predominantly died between the ages of 20 and 40. The death rate at older ages is lower. Particularly the median age at death among women is lower due to factors such as pregnancy and childbirth,” he said.

He underlined that they rarely come across causes of death other than blunt trauma, as diseases with symptoms such as fever or diarrhea do not leave any traces on the skeleton.

The most frequent health problems include abscess and tooth loss, he said, adding: “These diseases also played an important role in childhood and youth.”

Prof. Dr. Wolf Rüdiger Teegen stated that they also benefited from the teeth in terms of the eating habits of the period,  “we see that a carbohydrate-rich diet was common, such as bread and porridge.”

“A certain group could eat meat regularly. The number of people who ate a lot of meat was low because meat-eating was dependent on social status,” he explained.

“From the researches, we know that beef is cheaper than pork. The pork was very popular during the Roman Empire. The most expensive meat was rabbit meat at that time,” he said.

Banner
Related Post

An amateur archeologist has discovered a Roman war site

1 November 2021

1 November 2021

Thanks to the insistence of an amateur archaeologist, a Roman battlefield in Switzerland has been identified. Shortly before the birth...

The ‘extraordinary’ Roman mosaic depicting scenes from Homer’s Iliad unearthed in a Rutland farmer’s field is the first of its kind in England

25 November 2021

25 November 2021

The 1,500-year-old mosaic discovered by a farmer was considered Britain’s “most exciting” Roman find. The artwork was discovered on private...

The Hittites Celebrated The Arrival of Spring With The Purilli Feast

23 March 2021

23 March 2021

Man is a being that lives in touch with nature. Spring is a season in which abundance gives many meanings...

4,000-year-old settlement found during Balasore town India

9 July 2021

9 July 2021

A 4,000-year-old settlement and ancient artifacts have been discovered in the Balasore district, India. The Odisha Institute for Maritime and...

1400-year-old artifacts discovered in the ancient city of Uzuncaburç (Diocaesarea)

26 January 2022

26 January 2022

During the excavations carried out in a tower in the ancient city of Uzuncaburç (Diocaesarea) in Mersin province in the...

The greatest Anglo-Saxon treasure trove ever unearthed has been discovered by a metal detectorist

10 November 2021

10 November 2021

A metal detector in West Norfolk, England, unearthed 131 coins and 4 golden artifacts going back 1,400 years. This is...

Archaeologists have discovered a 2800-year-old Urartian Castle in eastern Turkey

17 June 2021

17 June 2021

Archaeologists discovered the ruins of a castle going back 2,800 years on a mountain 2,500 meters (8,200 feet) above sea...

South Ockendon’s Belhus Park Golf Course: A Tudor Garden Discovered

15 July 2021

15 July 2021

Under a golf course, the ruins of Tudor and Jacobean gardens were unearthed. Aerial images of Belhus Park Golf Course...

Medieval ship found off the west coast of Sweden

5 February 2022

5 February 2022

A previously undiscovered wreck has been found outside of Fjällbacka on the Swedish west coast. Analysis of wood samples shows...

Medieval Ring with a Skull Emblem Found in Wales and The Gold Coins are Declared Treasure

11 April 2021

11 April 2021

Located in wales nine treasure finds dating from the medieval and post-medieval periods have been declared treasure. Metal detectors in...

Europe’s oldest grave of a newborn girl found in İtaly

15 December 2021

15 December 2021

An international team of researchers has found Europe’s oldest tomb of a newborn girl, dating back 10,000 years, in Liguria....

Archaeologists have unearthed an incredible hoard of over 300 Iron Age ‘potins’ in West London

17 July 2021

17 July 2021

Archaeologists at an HS2 construction site in Hillingdon, West London discovered an astonishing treasure of over 300 Iron Age ‘potins”....

Egypt unearths 2,300-year-old remains of Greco-Roman town in Alexandria

28 August 2021

28 August 2021

An Egyptian archeological team discovered the ruins of a Greco-Roman residential and commercial town in the north coast city of...

Southwest Germany’s Oldest Gold Artifact Found

28 May 2021

28 May 2021

Archaeologists discovered the 3,800-year-old burial of a woman who died when she was around 20 years old in what is...

Roman-era Mixers and Millstones Made with Geology in Mind

22 September 2021

22 September 2021

A study on stone tools from an outpost of the Roman Empire has found that for ancient bakers and millers,...

Comments
Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.