21 April 2024 The Future is the Product of the Past

In Turkey’s Zerzevan Castle, a badge bearing the US national symbol was discovered

Recent investigations have led to the discovery of a badge bearing the pattern of the Great Seal of the United States as archaeologists continue excavations in Zerzevan Castle, a location previously utilized as a military settlement under the Roman Empire in southeastern Turkey’s Diyarbakir province.

Excavations work, initiated in 2014 by the Ministry of Culture and Tourism, Dicle University, the Turkish Historical Society, and some other regional organizations, continue in the 3000-year-old castle.

A Roman Mithras underground temple, tower defense, church, office building, residential houses, grain and arms depots, bunkers, rock tombs, and water channels, as well as many vital artifacts, were revealed in the Zerzevan Castle.

Aytaç Coşkun, a faculty member at Dicle University and the head of the excavation team of the site, told Anadolu Agency (AA) that they found a badge during their recent excavation work.

According to the news in the Daily Sabah, the motif on the surface of the badge, discovered at a depth of 125 centimeters (49.25 inches) on the eastern walls of Zerzevan Castle, was first designed in 1782, Coşkun said.

The Great Seal of the United State is seen on a $1 bill. (AA Photo)
The Great Seal of the United State is seen on a $1 bill. (AA Photo)

“Early examples of this type of badge or buttons were used in the U.S. in the 1850s. Since 1902, this badge-like coat of arms has also been used by the U.S. Army. Similar examples were also used in World War I and belong to the general service unit,” he stressed.

He added that the Latin inscription “E Pluribus Unum” was placed on the badge. “This is the first official slogan of the U.S. This slogan, which is Latin (the official language of the Roman Empire), means ‘from multiplicity to unity.’ It was used to mean the union of the 13 colonies that make up the U.S,” he explained.

“On the right paw of the eagle depiction on the badge is an olive branch, on the left is a tightly drawn bundle consisting of 13 arrows. It is known that these symbols represent the ‘power of peace and war,’” he noted.

“A scroll inscribed ‘E Pluribus Unum’ is seen on the eagle’s beak. The shield, located on the chest of the eagle and representing the states, indicates the unity of the federal government. A bright constellation of 13 stars was used above the eagle’s head.

A photo of the badge was found in Zerzevan Castle, Diyarbakır, southeastern Turkey. (AA Photo)
A photo of the badge was found in Zerzevan Castle, Diyarbakır, southeastern Turkey. (AA Photo)

“The unveiling of this badge of copper-zinc alloy at the Zerzevan Fortress is quite interesting and engaging,” said Coşkun, adding that there have been no such findings in an archaeological excavation in Turkey or abroad according to their research.

“Similar examples have only been found in the U.S. and the U.K. Detailed analyses … were performed on the badge. It turned out that post-15th-century technology was used. Also, the analysis showed that the badge remained under the ground for about 250-300 years, since the 18th century,” he noted.

“Early examples of this type of badge or buttons were used in the U.S. in the 1850s. Since 1902, this badge-like coat of arms has also been used by the U.S. Army,” he said, highlighting how surprising it is to find such an item that probably belongs to the period of the U.S. foundation.

Zerzevan Castle sits on a 124-meter (406.82-foot) rocky hill at a strategic point between the ancient cities of Amida and Dara. Due to its location, the castle dominates the entire valley and controls a large area on the ancient trade route.

Related Articles

Luxurious Ancient Roman Home With Magnificent Mosaic Wall uncovered between the Roman Forum and the Palatine Hill

14 December 2023

14 December 2023

Archaeologists have uncovered a luxurious Roman home between Rome’s Palatine Hill and the Roman Forum, boasting an “unparalleled” mosaic featuring...

The discovery of a 380-million-year-old heart sheds new light on our bodies’ evolution

16 September 2022

16 September 2022

Researchers from Curtin University have discovered the world’s oldest heart in a ‘beautifully preserved’ ancient jawed fish fossil 380 million...

Electoral inscriptions just discovered in Pompeii reveal clientelism in ancient Rome

29 September 2023

29 September 2023

Several electoral inscriptions, the ancient equivalent of today’s electoral posters and pamphlets, have appeared on the walls of the room...

A cemetery belonging to 54 children was found during the excavation in the old quarry in Diyarbakır, Türkiye

4 January 2024

4 January 2024

During the archaeological excavation carried out in the area considered to be an old quarry in the Kulp district of...

An unknown human group is revealed in a 7,200-year-old skeleton discovered in Indonesia

27 August 2021

27 August 2021

According to a study released this week, archaeologists uncovered the bones of a 7,200-year-old skeleton from a female hunter-gatherer in...

High-status Macedonian tomb discovered in ancient Aegae, Central Macedonia

2 April 2024

2 April 2024

In the ancient city of Aegae (present-day Vergina) in Imathia, Central Macedonia, during the construction of the sewerage network, tomb...

The Oklahoma City Museum of Art will launch “The Painters of Pompeii” on June 26

23 June 2021

23 June 2021

A number of collection highlights will travel to North America for the first time as part of the exhibition The...

The human remains of 29 people buried as offerings in a pre-Inca temple were found at the Huaca Santa Rosa de Pucalá excavation site

23 October 2021

23 October 2021

The human remains of 29 people buried as sacrificial offerings have been discovered in a pre-Inca temple in northern Peru....

Iron Age port discovered on Swedish island of Gotska Sandön

21 September 2023

21 September 2023

Archaeologists have discovered an Iron Age port on Gotska Sandön, an island and national park in Sweden’s Gotland district. In...

The Ancestors of Today’s Barbie Dolls “Coptic dolls”

23 September 2023

23 September 2023

For as long as there has been civilization, children have played with dolls. Wooden dolls with bead hair have been...

Hundreds of oil lamps discovered in Aigai, “the City of Goats”

23 September 2023

23 September 2023

During the ongoing excavations in the Aigai Ancient City, located near the Yuntdağı Köseler Village of Manisa province in western...

Medieval Lincoln imp found in hidden trapdoor above toilet

18 April 2024

18 April 2024

Tracy and Rory Vorster living in Lincoln, England, have discovered a trapdoor in their bathroom with a grotesque face bearing...

Archeologists find a 3,500-year-old mosaic in central Turkey

16 September 2021

16 September 2021

Archaeologists have discovered a 3,500-year-old mosaic in central Turkey, which might be one of the world’s oldest. The impressive power...

A previously unknown subterranean tract of an Augustan-era aqueduct has been rediscovered in Naples

4 February 2023

4 February 2023

A previously unknown subterranean tract nearly half a mile long of an Augustan-era aqueduct has been rediscovered in Naples, southern...

A woman was buried in a canoe on her way to the ‘destination of souls’ 800 years ago

25 August 2022

25 August 2022

According to new research, Up to 800 years ago, mourners buried a young woman in a ceremonial canoe to represent...