27 November 2022 The Future is the Product of the Past

Viking Family identified using New DNA Technology

Researchers were able to confirm the connection between two Viking remains discovered in Denmark and England thanks to new DNA technologies.

The researchers suspected that the two bodies, one discovered in Otterup, Funen, Denmark, in 2005, and the other in a mass grave in Oxford, England, were related.

It is because of a combination of DNA technology and access to a multitude of resources that researchers were able to uncover the relationship between the two Danish Vikings who lived in the 1000s. The two Vikings might have been half-brothers or uncle and nephews.

New method

“We know so much about DNA that we can start to find family relationships, due to the fact that we have so much material to research. That’s new,” research director Lasse Sørensen at the Danish National Museum noted.

He says that with traditional archaeological methods without DNA analysis, it would have been impossible to find out whether the two Vikings were related. 

Viking familiy new tech
The connection between the two Vikings is very special, says Lasse Sørensen. Source

One was excavated in Otterup in 2005 by archaeologists from Odense City Museums, while the other was found in a mass grave in Oxford. He was one of the Danish Vikings who settled in England in the early 1000s, and who later lost his life in a massacre ordered by the English king Æthelred 2.

The connection between the two Vikings is very special, says Lasse Sørensen.

Therefore, this finding is very special, and the researchers hope it will help advance our understand of the Viking’s living conditions during the period.

The skeletons are part of the exhibition at the National Museum in Copenhagen, which opens on June 26.

Source: Norway Today

Photo: Peder Gjersøe / SCANPIX

Banner
Related Post

The ashes of 8,000 victims were found in two mass graves near the Soldau concentration camp in Poland

14 July 2022

14 July 2022

Polish authorities said they had unearthed two mass graves near the former Nazi concentration camp Soldau containing the ashes of...

15 new sculptures discovered in Turkey’s sculpture paradise Yesemek

8 December 2021

8 December 2021

Archaeologists discovered 15 new sculptures during recent digs around the Yesemek Open Air Museum and Sculpture Workshop in the Islahiye...

The enigma behind King Tut’s’space dagger,’ according to archaeologists, has finally been solved

24 February 2022

24 February 2022

Archaeologists have finally solved the enigma of King Tutankhamun’s dagger, which was discovered 3,400 years ago. A new examination of...

Outstanding Bronze Age artifacts discovered in the Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes region of France

23 August 2021

23 August 2021

Hundreds of bronze objects have been discovered buried in pottery in the Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes region of France. The research team, led...

This Month in the “You Will See What You Don’t See” Project

11 February 2021

11 February 2021

Izmir Archeology Museum started to exhibit the unseen artifacts in its warehouses last month in the project that started under...

Export barred on roundel manuscript gifted to Queen Elizabeth I by Archbishop

12 September 2022

12 September 2022

A rare presentation manuscript that Archbishop of Canterbury Matthew Parker gave to Queen Elizabeth I in 1573 has been sold...

The unknown importance of Göllü Dağ on the route of the first humans’ Transition from Africa to Europe

4 October 2021

4 October 2021

The researches conducted in Göllü Dağ and its surroundings, located within the borders of Niğde province in Central Anatolia, and...

1700 years ago the Korean peninsula had more genetic diversity than in our time, “Facial reconstruction possible through DNA analyses”

22 June 2022

22 June 2022

An international team led by The University of Vienna and the Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology in collaboration...

Oldest found human traces on Roof of the World, Is it art?

21 October 2021

21 October 2021

Dr. David Zhang and his team’s investigations of Quesang on the Tibetan Plateau in 2018 and 2020 sparked controversy, along...

2,000-year-old altar found in Alexandria Troas

9 October 2021

9 October 2021

A 2,000-year-old altar was unearthed during the ongoing excavations in the ancient city of Alexandria Troas, in a region close...

Hebrew University Archaeologists have Unveiled 7,000-year-old Seal İmpressions

10 June 2021

10 June 2021

Israeli archaeologists unveiled a 7,000-year-old clay seal impression used for commerce and protection of property, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem...

“Exceptionally rare” gold sword pommel given to Scottish national museums

24 October 2022

24 October 2022

An “exceptionally rare” solid gold sword pommel found by a metal detectorist near Blair Drummond, Stirling, has been acquired by...

The 1,000-year-old surgical kit found in Sican tomb, Peru

28 March 2022

28 March 2022

A set of surgical tools indicating that the deceased was a surgeon was found in a funerary bundle found in...

The history of Kültepe Mound in central Turkey goes back another 300 years

12 December 2021

12 December 2021

In Kültepe, where the first written documents of Anatolia were unearthed, the date based on 5 thousand years was updated...

21 Copperplate Inscriptions discovered at Ghanta Matham in India

14 June 2021

14 June 2021

During excavations at Ghanta Matham in the Indian state of Andhra Pradesh,  important 21 copper plates for the Mallikarjuna Swami...

Comments
Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *