26 February 2024 The Future is the Product of the Past

Archaeologists have unearthed part of Hadrian’s Aqueduct, one of the Largest Hydraulic Works of the 2nd century AD, and Extremely Rare Greek Coins

Archaeologists have unearthed part of Hadrian’s aqueduct, one of the largest hydraulic works of the 2nd century AD, and a wonderful treasure during archaeological excavations in Tenea, an ancient Greek town near Corinth.

Directorate of Prehistoric and Classical Antiquities of the Ministry of Culture said the discovery was made during excavations at Chiliomodi in Corinthia, southern Greece, in October 2023, which also yielded, among other significant finds, a treasure trove of 29 rare silver ancient Greek coins dating from the late 6th century BC to the 330s BC.

Several are among the rarest and most historic coins of ancient Greece, the ministry says.

They include three staters of Elis minted at Olympia during different Olympic Games, staters of Aegina with a land instead of a sea turtle, staters of Stymphalos, Argos and Opuntia Lokron, as well as staters of Thebes from the 5th century BC depicting Hercules suffocating two snakes with his hands.

The 29 ancient coins from between the 6th and 4th centuries B.C. Photo: Greek Ministry of Culture

The presence of this treasure is linked to the discovery of ritual artifacts (female and animal figurines, miniature vessels, and others) last year and this year, giving the uncovered sites a distinct ritual character.

The excavations at the site, which is about 80 kilometers southwest of Athens, provided archaeologists with an excellent opportunity to discover and study a section of the Hadrianic aqueduct that brought water to the ancient city of Corinth from Stymphalus.

According to a statement issued by the Ministry of Culture, the unearthed aqueduct near the Roman baths along the Karkana River is one of Greece’s largest hydraulic works of the 2nd century AD. Archaeologists managed to excavate about 31 meters in a north-south direction. Based on preliminary studies, researchers could determine the structure has external vertical walls that are 3.20 meters in height. It is a water conduit constructed with a semicircular vaulted roof, whose surface was visible in antiquity.

The section of the Hadrianic aqueduct now uncovered. Photo: Greek Ministry of Culture

For ages, Tenea existed only in myths and historical texts. According to legend, it was constructed by Trojan prisoners of war circa 1100 BC.

At the same time, a portion of the prehistoric settlement of Tenea was found and excavated, dating back to the Early Bronze Age II (2600-2300 BC), confirming the occupation of the area before the fall of Troy. It was found on the outskirts of the hill Agioi Asomatoi, east of the aqueduct.

In addition, a rich complex of buildings from the late archaic to the Hellenistic period was discovered and excavated, including individual places of worship and three extremely elaborate cisterns, one of which had a cathodic-anodic scale.

Greek Ministry of Culture

Cover Credit: Ministry of Culture

Related Articles

Human Relief Found at Million Stone Excavation Site in İstanbul

18 July 2021

18 July 2021

The Milion Stone (also known as the Million Stone) from the Eastern Roman period is one of important the historical...

The oldest evidence of human cannibalism as a funerary practice in Europe

7 October 2023

7 October 2023

According to a new study, cannibalism was a common funerary practice in northern Europe around 15,000 years ago, with people...

Hidden 13th-century carving of ‘face of Christ’ discovered in Ballymore, Ireland

12 May 2022

12 May 2022

At Ballymore, in the county of Westmeath, Ireland, sunlight led to an interesting and special discovery. The sunlight revealed that...

Relief masks discovered in Turkey’s ancient city of Kastabala

7 January 2022

7 January 2022

In the ancient city of Kastabala (Castabala), which dates back to 500 BC, located in Turkey’s southern province of Osmaniye,...

A first in 35 years! Child grave with bracelets and gifts found in ancient city of Kelenderis

25 June 2022

25 June 2022

During this year’s excavations in the ancient city of Kelenderis, founded on the Mediterranean coast in the southern province of...

A 4,500-year-old rope remains were discovered at Turkey’s Seyitömer mound

26 December 2021

26 December 2021

In the rescue excavation carried out in the mound, which is located within the license border of Çelikler Seyitömer Electricity...

Rare bronze hand discovered in Roman Vindolanda, England

11 July 2023

11 July 2023

One of Europe’s most important Roman archeological sites is the Fort of Vindolanda, one of the earliest Roman garrisons built...

A 900-year-old Crusader sword was found by a diver off Israel’s Carmen coast

18 October 2021

18 October 2021

A meter-long sword dating back to the Crusader period was found by an amateur diver on the seabed off the...

New Study reveals how England’s ‘White Queen’ worshipped a disembowelled saint at the Chapel of St Erasmus

5 December 2022

5 December 2022

A new study reveals the story of how England’s “White Queen”, Elizabeth Woodville, wife of Edward IV, once worshipped at...

Fossils of sea creatures 35 million years old discovered in eastern Turkey

17 August 2021

17 August 2021

In Turkey’s eastern province of Mus, a team of researchers discovered fossils of sea creatures estimated to be 35 million...

Crusade period grave field and a sword discovered in Finland

15 October 2023

15 October 2023

A large cemetery from the time of the Crusades was discovered near a medieval stone church in Salo Perttel, a...

Dozens of unique bronze ornaments discovered in a drained peat bog in Poland

28 January 2023

28 January 2023

Numerous bronze ornaments have been discovered in Poland’s Chełmno region (Kuyavian-Pomeranian Voivodeship). Archaeologists report that dozens of bronze ornaments, including...

A 2000-year-old bronze military diploma was discovered in Turkey’s Perre ancient city

2 January 2022

2 January 2022

During excavations in the ancient city of Perre, located in the southeastern Turkish province of Adiyaman, archaeologists uncovered a bronze...

An Ampulla was discovered for the first time in the ancient city of Dara, Turkey

11 January 2022

11 January 2022

An ampulla was found for the first time in the ancient city of Dara, located in the province of Mardin...

Early Female Emperors in Japan “Empress Kōken”

2 July 2021

2 July 2021

Born into the aristocratic Fujiwara clan, this extraordinary woman first ascended to the throne as Empress Kōken and became the...