16 October 2021 The Future is the Product of the Past

Archaeologists discover bones of a woman who lived 14,000 years ago at a site in The Iberian Peninsula

Archaeologists have discovered the bones of a lady who lived 14,000 years ago, the earliest traces of a modern burial at the historically significant Cova Gran de Santa Linya site in Spain, which has previously yielded evidence of the last Neanderthals and the first modern humans.

Cova Gran retains preserves innumerable buried traces of the sediments that comprise it, allowing researchers to recreate the history of the populations that lived in the Pre-Pyrenees of Lleida during the previous 50,000 years, from Neanderthals and the first Homo sapiens to the earliest farmers.

The team of researchers from the Archaeological Heritage Center at the Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (CEPARQ-UAB) and the CENIEH, who have been studying Cova Gran since its discovery in 2002, had previously discovered material records dating from 45,000 to 4000 years ago. Despite this, no bone remains of the people who lived there had been discovered until the 2020 excavation campaign.

The pelvic girdle is from an adult woman, maybe a tiny one, who has been named “Linya, the La Noguera woman,” according to the initial paleoanthropological categorization of all the bones discovered, which was released this week.

Two femurs, an arm bone, leg bone and bones from hands and feet of 'Linya, the La Noguera woman' were unearthed. A skull, vertebrate and ribs were also discovered
Two femurs, an arm bone, leg bone, and bones from hands and feet of ‘Linya, the La Noguera woman’ were unearthed. A skull, vertebrate, and ribs were also discovered. Photo: CENIEH

Two femurs, one of which is still connected to the pelvis, as well as long bones from the upper (humerus, radius/ulna) and lower limbs (tibia and fibula), as well as scattered metapodials and phalanges, are among the remains. Although present, the skull and axial skeleton (vertebrae and ribs) are poorly represented.

In a statement, Alfonso Benito Calvo of the Centro Nacional de Investigación Sobre la Evolución Humana (CENIEH) said, ‘We recovered bone remains which definitely belonged to a human skeleton, and still partly connected, two meters below the ground of a side area of the excavation,’ he said.

Cova Gran de Santa Linya is 'key' to studying human presence in the northeastern Iberian Peninsula
Cova Gran de Santa Linya is the ‘key’ to studying human presence in the northeastern Iberian Peninsula. Photo: CENIEH

Alfonso Benito Calvo says, ” A location that didn’t presage the appearance of this kind of remains”

Several huge blocks had fallen from the cave’s roof, and the bones were discovered there. Linya’s bones were discovered laying horizontally in the supine posture, with her skull and body facing up.

The Cova Gran de Santa Linya site spans more than 2,500 square miles and is one of the so-called ‘transition’ locations where evidence of the last Neanderthals, 45,000 years ago, and the earliest modern humans, 37,000 to 30,000 years ago.

Experts believe the Cova Gran de Santa Linya site to be “Key” to the study of human presence in the northern Iberian Peninsula.

Previous evidence of the Last Glacial Maximum, which occurred between 20,000 and 15,000 years ago, has also been discovered by archaeologists here. The site has also uncovered evidence of the first farmers, who lived between 7,000 and 4,000 years ago.

Banner
Related Post

East and West Meeting at the King’s Dinner Table

7 April 2021

7 April 2021

Researchers from Tezukayama University and the Uzbekistan Archaeological Institute reported that a food pantry about 37 feet long and 10...

1650-Year-Old Earthen Grills Unearthed in Assos Excavations

14 August 2021

14 August 2021

Excavations continue in Assos Ancient City, a rich settlement of the period, which is located within the borders of Behramkale...

Archaeologists Reveal a Hair Style They Think Was Fashion 2000 Years Ago

19 February 2021

19 February 2021

The small 5 cm figurine found during excavations at Wimpole in Cambridgeshire surprised with its details. National Trust archaeologists and...

Scientists unlock the ‘Cosmos’ on the Antikythera Mechanism

13 March 2021

13 March 2021

Scientists may have finally made a complete digital model of the 2000-year-old Cosmos panel of a mechanical device called the...

World’s Largest Geoglyphs Found in the Thar Desert

29 May 2021

29 May 2021

A massive spiral encompassing 100,000 square meters unearthed in the Indian desert may be the greatest drawing ever drawn. The...

Archaeologists discover a 4,000-year-old ancient city in the Iraqi Dhi Qar region

20 July 2021

20 July 2021

An astonishing find was made by archaeologists in Iraq‘s Dhi Qar province, where an ancient settlement estimated to be 4,000...

Excavation of Carlisle Roman bathhouse uncovers a connection between the site and a third-century Roman emperor

27 September 2021

27 September 2021

Excavation of a Roman bath at the Carlisle Cricket Club in Stanwix, part of the Uncovering Roman Carlisle project, has...

Underneath an Illegal Excavation House, a Subterranean City Is Revealed!

25 June 2021

25 June 2021

Upon the information that illegal excavations were carried out in a house in the İscehisar district of Afyonkarahisar in western...

Archaeologists Find the Missing Link of the Alphabet

15 April 2021

15 April 2021

Researchers believe that Tel Lachish pottery is the oldest of its kind found in the region, and could explain how...

Colossae Ancient City Excavation Works Begin

8 September 2021

8 September 2021

Excavations of the ancient city of Colossae, located in the Honaz district of Denizli province in western Turkey, are starting...

Analysis of 13,000-Year-Old Bones Reveals Violent Raids in Prehistoric ‘Jebel Sahaba’

28 May 2021

28 May 2021

Since its discovery in the 1960s, the 13-millennium-old Jebel Sahaba cemetery (Nile Valley, Sudan) has been regarded as one of...

The Half of the Rare Oil Lamp Found in Jerusalem May be in Budapest

9 May 2021

9 May 2021

We had recently reported on a grotesque lamp found in Jerusalem. The other half of the oil lamp, which is...

Found Home of the Legendary Viking Woman Who Crossed the Atlantic 500 Years Before Columbus

11 March 2021

11 March 2021

Archaeologists in Iceland recently excavated a farm believed to belong to the legendary Viking woman Gudrid Torbjörnsdottir. She is believed...

An Urartian female executive grave was found at the Çavuştepe Mound

9 September 2021

9 September 2021

The grave of an Urartian, who was buried with his horse, cattle, and dog, had been found recently. Today, another...

Archaeologists Unearth Cisterns at Izmir’s Ancient “City of Mother Goddess”

2 June 2021

2 June 2021

In the ancient city of Metropolis, in western Turkey, in the province of Izmir, something that played an important role...

Comments
Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *