3 February 2023 The Future is the Product of the Past

Who Are The Sea Peoples?

Who are the Sea Peoples, which are seen as the beginning of the dark age, and where did they come from? Their names are mentioned in historical documents, but often not much is known about who they were even today.

During the Late Bronze Age and Early Iron Age, civilizations in the Near East, Aegean, Anatolia, North Africa, the Caucasus, the Balkans, and the Eastern Mediterranean collapsed and disappeared from the map. So what happened during this period? What caused such an uproar and collapse?

Historians believe that the period was violent and culturally destructive, ending with the disintegration of the Hittite Empire, Mycenaean kingdoms, Kassites, Ugarites, Amorite states, and the Aegean court economy. Despite the downturn, some provinces survived the collapse, such as the New Kingdom of Egypt, Assyria, Phenicia, and Elam.

Historians describe this period as “the worst disaster in ancient history” with various theories such as environmental factors behind the collapse, drought, a general system collapse, technological changes in war, disruption in trade, a volcanic eruption, and the elusive Sea People.

The sea peoples
The Sea Peoples

Almost nothing is known about the Sea People, the only evidence of their existence comes from sparse contemporary sources. This evidence comes from interpretative sources at best and their accuracy is often debated in scientific circles.

It has been suggested that the People of the Sea were a maritime confederation that may have come from Western Asia Minor, the Aegean, the Mediterranean islands of Southern Europe.

The term “Peuples de la mer” (literally meaning “sea peoples”) was first coined by the French Egyptologist Emmanuel de Rougé while reading reliefs in Medinet Habu and became more popular in the late 19th century with a linked theory of migration.

The historical narratives to describe the Sea People originate mainly from seven Ancient Egyptian sources (with some information from Hittite sources) that gave the names of the nine ancient cultures responsible for this period: Denyen, Ekwesh, Lukka, Peleset, Shekelesh, Sherden, Teresh, Tjeker, and Weshesh. (Further suggestions of narratives in other civilizations include Etruscans, Trojans, Philistines, Mycenaeans, and even Minoans).

One such source (Tanis Stele II)  and draws attention to an event the Ramesses II period when the Nile Delta was attacked by Sherden raiders. An inscription on the stele: “The rebel Sherden, who no one knew how to fight, came courageously sailing from the middle of the sea on their warships, none of them could stand them.

A narrative from the reign of Ramses III (2nd Pharaoh of the 20th Dynasty) also records the waves of invasion of the seafaring peoples; The most detailed account is Ramses III, around 1175 as the invaders retreated during the “Battle of Delta”. It is found in the morgue temple of Medinet Habu in Thebes, where Ramses is depicted.

Medinet Habu
Medinet Habu Morgue temple

Medinet Habu is written as follows in the inscription in the morgue temple:

“Now the northern countries on their islands were trembling in their bodies. They entered the channels of the mouths of the Nile. The nostrils have ceased, their desire is to breathe. His Majesty fights against them like a whirlwind, like a runner on the battlefield. His horror and terror penetrated their bodies; (they) capsized and crushed in their places. Their hearts have been taken; their souls flew away. Their weapon is scattered across the sea. ”

It is still a mystery who these people mentioned in the Egyptian documents are and why they came here. Since they were generally named as Sea Peoples in Egyptian documents, they continued to be called by this name in history.

The bright times of Anatolia have entered a dark period with them. They are also known as the beginning of the dark age.

Source: Matthew J. Adams, 2016, “the philistines and other“ sea peoples ”in text and archeology” WF Albright Archaeological Research Institute

Banner
Related Post

Statue of Roman Emperor Hadrianus found in western Turkey

14 September 2021

14 September 2021

Excavations in the ancient city of Alabanda in the western province of Aydin have uncovered pieces of the statue of...

The place of Puduhepa’s hometown Lawazantiya will be illuminated with Tatarlı Höyük

9 November 2021

9 November 2021

Excavations at Tatarlı Höyük (mound) are trying to reach findings that will enable the determination of the location of Lawazantiya,...

The “food” thousands of years ago may be the ancestor of a Turkish dessert

25 July 2021

25 July 2021

The rock paintings and kitchen materials found in the cave, which were discovered by a shepherd and emerged as a...

Ancient Hippodrome, Subject of Ben-Hur Movie, Will Become “Arkeo Sports Park”

8 August 2021

8 August 2021

Ben-Hur, a wealthy prince living in Jerusalem, is a historical figure who struggled for the freedom of the Jews during...

It is Thought That an Ancient Port will be Reached in Istanbul Metro Excavations

11 April 2021

11 April 2021

New findings were found in the Kabataş excavations, which started a year ago under the presidency of the Istanbul Archeology...

2,000-year-old altar found in Alexandria Troas

9 October 2021

9 October 2021

A 2,000-year-old altar was unearthed during the ongoing excavations in the ancient city of Alexandria Troas, in a region close...

The circular-shaped structure unearthed in Uşaklı mound may point to the holy Hittite city of Zippalanda

27 December 2022

27 December 2022

Italian-Turkish team of archaeologists led by the University of Pisa unearthed a mysterious circle-shaped structure from the Hittite era at...

Getting to Know Matar Kubilea

8 February 2021

8 February 2021

Hittite state’s, With its collapse in 1200-1190 BC, Anatolia entered a period of drift from holistic to dispersal. (The Hittite...

1,800-year-old Roman remains discovered in valley of eastern Turkey

21 February 2022

21 February 2022

Roman remains dating back 1800 years have been found in a valley in eastern Turkey. Among the Roman ruins found...

A 1600-year-old writing set was unearthed in the city of Bathonea, which has the oldest ancient port in Istanbul

21 August 2022

21 August 2022

During the Istanbul Bathonea excavations, a 1600-year-old writing set containing a miniature vessel, a bone writing pen, and an inkwell,...

World’s Oldest Place Name Signs

4 February 2021

4 February 2021

Throughout the history of the world, our interest and curiosity in ancient cultures and lives continue to increase day by...

Egypt unearths ancient quarters of mining leader in the Sinai Peninsula during the Middle Kingdom

19 January 2022

19 January 2022

The Egyptian Ministry of Tourism and Antiquities announced recently that an Egyptian archaeological mission working in Wadi Al-Nasab in South...

Archaeologists have discovered a 2800-year-old Urartian Castle in eastern Turkey

17 June 2021

17 June 2021

Archaeologists discovered the ruins of a castle going back 2,800 years on a mountain 2,500 meters (8,200 feet) above sea...

A stone bathtub, which is considered to be the first example of ‘water birth’, was found in Ani Ruins

7 September 2022

7 September 2022

A stone tub was found in the large bath, whose birth was mentioned in a work by the Turkish scholar...

Structures in Turkey’s Panaztepe pointing out a 5,000-year-old settlement found

8 November 2021

8 November 2021

In the 5000-year-old Panaztepe settlement located in the Menemen district of Izmir, structures thought to belong to the oldest period...

Comments
Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *