29 February 2024 The Future is the Product of the Past

In Egypt, archaeologists have discovered a 4,500-year-old Sun temple.

Archaeologists discovered an ancient Sun temple in the Egyptian desert that dates back 4,500 years.

The remains were discovered under another temple at Abu Gurob, 20 kilometers south of Cairo. Ancient remains are believed to be one of six sun temples built some 4,500 years ago. Only two of these temples have been found to date.

Mission co-director Massimiliano Nuzzolo, an assistant professor of Egyptology at the Polish Academy of Sciences’ Institute for the Mediterranean and Oriental Cultures in Warsaw, told CNN on Monday ancient remains appeared to be from the mid-25th century BCE.

Nuzzolosaid it had been partially uncovered in 1898 before but mistakenly identified as part of an existing temple.

“The archaeologists of the 19th century excavated only a very small part of this mud bricks building below the stone temple of Nyuserra and concluded that this was a previous building phase of the same temple,” Nuzzolo wrote in an email.

“Now our finds demonstrate that this was a completely different building, erected before Nyuserra,” he said.

Archaeologists digging at the site in 1898 uncovered the sun temple of Nyuserra, also known as Neuserre or Nyuserre, the sixth king of Egypt’s 5th dynasty who reigned between 2400 and 2370 BCE.

The team says the temple was built using mud bricks with some stone elements.
The team says the temple was built using mud bricks with some stone elements. Photo: M. Nuzzolo

The dig reveals that underneath the sun temple of Nyuserra, the sixth king of the 5th dynasty in Egypt was another sun temple.

Nuzzolo and his team uncovered seals etched with the names of previous monarchs, as well as the foundations for limestone columns and a threshold. Dozens of preserved beer jars filled with a form of mud used in religious rites were also discovered.

The temple was “impressive in size,” according to Nuzzolo but due to being built out of mud bricks rather than the typical stone, it was easily destroyed when a new king wished to build his own temple on top.

Among the findings were dozens of beer jars. Photo: M. Osman
Among the findings were dozens of beer jars. Photo: M. Osman

The temples were constructed while the Fifth Dynasty pharaohs were still living, with the intention of elevating them to the position of deity. Pyramids, on the other hand, were constructed as the last resting places to ensure that pharaohs were resurrected as gods in the afterlife.

Since this recent find was made out of mud brick, it’s possible the remaining temples were also made from this perishable material and could be difficult to find.

The dig was conducted together by the Polish Academy of Sciences and the University of Naples L’Orientale.

Related Articles

According to researchers, the bones discovered underneath St. Peter’s Basilica may not be his

5 June 2021

5 June 2021

Three Italian researchers have voiced doubts about whether St. Peter’s bones are buried underneath the Rome basilica that bears his...

Rare textiles and dwellings discovered in the submerged Neolithic settlement near Rome

6 June 2023

6 June 2023

Underwater archaeologists have discovered rare, well-preserved textiles, basketry, and cordage from the early Neolithic period in an area near Rome,...

The Iremir Mound illuminates the pre-Urartian period in East Van

27 July 2021

27 July 2021

Archaeological findings unearthed in the excavations carried out at the İremir Mound in the Gürpınar district of Van, in eastern...

Hundreds of silver coins have been found near the castle of Lukov in Moravia

4 September 2021

4 September 2021

In the forest near the Southern Moravian Fortress Lukov, two members of the Society of Friends of the Lukov Fortress...

Egypt Traces Relics of Ramses III to the Arabian Peninsula

7 June 2021

7 June 2021

Following various findings showing ancient Egyptian King Ramses III had a presence on the Arabian Peninsula, an Egyptian archaeological team...

The oldest meerschaum artifact found in Anatolia; of Çavlum Seal

18 July 2021

18 July 2021

The stamp seal unearthed during the rescue excavations of Çavlum Village on the Eskişehir Alpu Plain is the oldest meerschaum...

3000 years old wooden wishing well discovered in Germany

7 January 2023

7 January 2023

In the town of Germering, in the Germany state of Bavaria, archaeologists have unearthed the remains of a well-preserved Bronze...

Ancient city “Germanicia” lost in 73 years

8 July 2021

8 July 2021

The presence of the ancient city of Germanicia, discovered during an illegal excavation in the southeast Turkish province of Kahramanmaraş...

A 5,000-year-old large house has been discovered in China’s Yangshao Village

7 December 2022

7 December 2022

Henan Provincial Institute of Cultural Heritage and Archaeology archaeologists have excavated the ruins of house foundations dating back more than...

More than 50 pairs of tweezers found during an excavation of a 2,000-year-old Roman settlement – Romans to blame for no-body-hair trend

31 May 2023

31 May 2023

More than 50 pairs of tweezers were found during the major excavation in Wroxeter City, Shropshire, one of the largest...

Declassified CIA Satellite Spy Program Reveals Lost Ancient Roman Forts

26 October 2023

26 October 2023

Archaeologists have discovered “massive” ancient Roman forts that redraw the borders of the ancient empire using images from a declassified...

Tang-e Chogan bas-relief carvings, Majestic treasures of Sassanid art, are under threat of destruction 

9 March 2022

9 March 2022

Treasures of Sassanid art, some of Tang-e Chogan’s bas-reliefs are under threat of complete destruction due to lack of maintenance...

Archaeologists discover the Americas’ oldest adobe architecture

7 December 2021

7 December 2021

On the north coast of Peru, researchers have discovered the oldest adobe architecture in the Americas, constructed with ancient mud...

Ancient rubbish dump under Hatshepsut temple reveals hundreds of artifacts

24 November 2021

24 November 2021

Polish archaeologists uncovered a 3,500-year-old dump while working on the reconstruction of the Hathor Goddess Chapel, which is part of...

Archaeologists have discovered a large-sized 4,000-Year-Old steppe pyramid of the Bronze Age in Kazakhstan

10 August 2023

10 August 2023

Archaeologists of L. N. Gumilyov Eurasian National University discovered a massive Bronze Age steppe pyramid associated with a horse cult...