26 January 2023 The Future is the Product of the Past

Archaeologists uncovered a kurgan tomb from a previously unknown culture

Archaeologists from the Siberian Federal University have unearthed a kurgan tomb and numerous bronze tools and artifacts from a previously unknown culture.

The discovery was first made when workers bulldozed a small hillock during the expansion of the 19th-century Shinnoye cemetery near the city of Krasnoyarsk in Siberia, Russia, and unearthed a massive 2,000-year-old tomb containing bronze artifacts from a “newly defined culture.”

Researchers from the Siberian Federal University, led by Dr. Dimitry Vinogradov, have been since 2021 excavated the site.

The team discovered the remains of 50 bodies, buried alongside numerous grave goods, in a large rectangular pit lined with timber and carpeted in birch bark. The tomb most likely had a wooden roof, which was destroyed during the land clearance.

The site dates from around 2,000 years ago and belongs to a previously unknown Scythian-type culture.

Photo: Dimitry Vinogradov
Photo: Dimitry Vinogradov

The archaeologists discovered a variety of everyday tools as well as sacred artifacts and weapons that the deceased would have used on their journeys into the afterlife inside the tomb, which was designed to hold about fifty people. There were “miniature symbolic bronze daggers and battle axes” scattered among knives, mirrors, needles, and ceramic drinking and eating vessels. Large bronze beads and plaques were also found, one of which featured a stag, which the lead archaeologist says was a common theme in prehistoric Siberian Scythian art.

The term “Scythian” does not specifically refer to any one thing, which is the main reason the tomb is being referred to as belonging to “an unknown Scythian culture.”

Vinogradov explained that the term Scythian refers to a triad of Iron Age archaeological features including “certain styles of bronze weaponry; horse-riding gear; and art featuring real and mythical animals – mainly stags, wild felines, birds of prey and mythical griffons”.

A collective disorganized pit burial. Photo: Dimitry Vinogradov

The researchers believe that the site served as a family tomb for generations, after which, was sealed off and set on fire. The color of the soil within the mound suggests the site was exposed to high temperatures. The researchers suspect that when the tomb was filled with bodies and no more space existed, “it was sealed off, set on fire, and left to burn” – becoming a “ kurgan” burial mound.

Based on the findings, Dr. Vinogradov and his colleagues believe the tomb is from a transitional culture known as “Tesinian” (first proposed by the late archaeologist and historian Mikhail Gryaznov, based on an archaeological site on the banks of the River Tes in the Minusinsk Basin), which likely emerged on the outskirts of the Tagar culture’s known territories during the 2nd or 1st century BC.

The archaeologists further insist that the Tagar culture should “be classified as a separate culture” due to the artifacts and burial practices discovered at this kurgan mound. Vinogradov characterized this extinct culture as “unique and different from anything we knew before.”

Bronze stag found in the burial mound, typical of the ‘Scythian triad Photo: Dimitry Vinogradov

Because a “kurgan” in this region, found in the Asian steppes and mostly associated with the Tagar culture (8th-1st century BC), usually consists of an earthen tumulus built over a tomb containing a single corpse, grave goods, and horses.

SIBERIAN FEDERAL UNIVERSITY

Cover Photo: Aerial view of the excavation site of a 2,000-year-old tomb, next to Shinnoye cemetery, Krasnoyarsk, Russia Photo: Dimitry Vinogradov

Banner
Related Post

Researchers explored a rock art site near Idupulapaya in India

1 October 2021

1 October 2021

A rock art site was discovered near Idupulapaya in the Indian state of Andhra Pradesh. Rock paintings from the Megalithic...

4,500-year-old rare Canaanite goddess sculpture found by a farmer in Gaza Strip

25 April 2022

25 April 2022

A farmer in the city of Khan Yunis, in the southern Gaza Strip, found a rare 4,500-year-old stone sculpture while...

A 4,500-year-old rope remains were discovered at Turkey’s Seyitömer mound

26 December 2021

26 December 2021

In the rescue excavation carried out in the mound, which is located within the license border of Çelikler Seyitömer Electricity...

The first time in Anatolia, a legionnaires’ cemetery belonging to the Roman Empire unearthed

18 November 2022

18 November 2022

In the ancient city of Satala, in the Kelkit district of Gümüşhane in the Eastern Black Sea region of Turkey,...

The longest inscription in Saudi Arabia turned out to belong to the last king of Babylon

25 July 2021

25 July 2021

The Saudi Commission for Tourism and National Heritage has announced the discovery of a 2,550-year-old inscription etched on basalt stone...

After 85 years of adventure, Globetrotting Mycenaean gold ring returns home

3 June 2022

3 June 2022

The 3,000-year-old gold Mycenaean ring, stolen from the Rhodes Archaeological Museum during World War II and later bought by a...

Archaeologists in Iraq find 2,700-year-old wine press

24 October 2021

24 October 2021

Stone bas-reliefs carved into the walls of an irrigation canal some nine kilometers (5.5 miles) long, and the remains of...

A Rare Late Neolithic Period Seal found in Domuztepe Mound

25 August 2022

25 August 2022

A rare Late Neolithic Seal was discovered during the 2022 excavations of the Domuztepe Mound (Domuztepe Höyük), located on the...

“Unprecedented” Phoenician necropolis found in southern Spain

28 April 2022

28 April 2022

A 4th or 5th-century B.C Phoenician necropolis has been found at Osuna in Southern Spain. A well-preserved underground limestone vault...

Norwegian Boy in Search of Granddad’s Wedding Ring Finds 1500-year-old Roman Jewellery

11 August 2021

11 August 2021

Sander Magnus Vang (12) needed to find his grandfather’s lost wedding ring. Instead, he found a 1500-year-old ring. The golden...

New Archaeological Discoveries may Confirm What is Written in the Bible

22 March 2021

22 March 2021

The importance of what is written in the scriptures in the development of archeology is really great. It is possible...

Middle Ages living space uncovered at an altitude of 1,800 meters in eastern Turkey

20 December 2021

20 December 2021

A living space carved into a bedrock considered to belong to the Middle Ages was found at a point overlooking...

Archaeologists in Peru discover a mummy tied with 800-year-old ropes

28 November 2021

28 November 2021

On Peru’s central coast, archaeologists discovered a mummy estimated to be at least 800 years old. The mummy’s body was...

5,700-Year-old Ancient “Chewing Gum” Gives Information About People and Bacteria of the Past

4 April 2021

4 April 2021

Researchers at the University of Copenhagen have successfully extracted the complete human genome from “chewing gum” thousands of years ago....

Archaeologists discover bones of a woman who lived 14,000 years ago at a site in The Iberian Peninsula

13 August 2021

13 August 2021

Archaeologists have discovered the bones of a lady who lived 14,000 years ago, the earliest traces of a modern burial...

Comments
Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *