11 August 2022 The Future is the Product of the Past

Sidamara, the largest sarcophagus of the Ancient World, got Eros relief 140 years later

The Sidamara Sarcophagus, which is considered to be one of the largest sarcophagi of the ancient world and weighs many tons, has received 140 years later its missing piece, the Eros Head.

The sarcophagus belonging to the 3rd century AD, which is known by this name because it is located in the village of Ambar, formerly Sidamara, on the Konya Ereğlisi-Karaman road in the center of Turkey, is known as the heaviest sarcophagus in the world with its weight of 32 tons. The artifact was found in 1900 and brought to Istanbul by Osman Hamdi Bey.

As a result of the cooperation of the Ministry of Culture and Tourism with the Victoria & Albert Museum in London, the piece brought to Turkey on June 10 was reunited with the historical artifact it belongs to.

Eros Head, which was transported from London to Turkey with the support of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Turkish Airlines, was placed on the giant sarcophagus with a weight of more than 30 tons, with scientific studies carried out jointly by the expert restorers of the Istanbul Archaeological Museums and the Victoria & Albert Museum.

The Sidamara Sarcophagus. Photo: Republic of Türkiye Ministry of Culture and Tourism

The columned sarcophagus from the Roman Period was opened to visitors in its original form at the Istanbul Archeology Museum today.

The height of the marble sarcophagus is 313 cm, its length is 381 cm, and its width is 200 cm. On the front face of the sarcophagus, there is a man sitting in the dress of a philosopher in the middle, a young girl in the dress of Artemis on the right, and a woman in the dress of Demeter with a veil on the left. At the two ends of this face, the Dioscurians hold the bridles of the horses. On the narrow side of the sarcophagus, a woman walking towards the tomb door with a tray of fruit in her hand, and a bearded man is holding a roll on the other side of the door. On the other long side and the other narrow side of the sarcophagus, a hunting scene is engraved. The owner of the sarcophagus and his wife are lying on the lid of the sarcophagus. On the frieze on the pedestal of the sarcophagus, puttos and Eros fighting against predators can be seen, on the other hand, horses training and chariot races.

Photo: Republic of Türkiye Ministry of Culture and Tourism

The Challenging Journey of the Magnifience Artifact

It was understood that the Eros Head, one of the high reliefs separated from the sarcophagus, which was discovered by the British Military Consul General Charles Wilson in 1882 and was buried again because it could not be moved, was taken to London.

The sarcophagus, which was re-discovered by a villager in the ancient city of Sidamara in Karaman in 1898, was reported to the Museum-i Hümayun, which is now the Istanbul Archeology Museum.

The giant sarcophagus, which was decided to be moved to the museum in Istanbul as a result of Osman Hamdi Bey’s investigations in the region, was moved to the center pulling with buffaloes under the conditions of the time. The magnificent work, which made a grueling journey with the special arrangement of the train wagons, reached today’s Istanbul Archeology Museum in 1901. 

Photo: Republic of Türkiye Ministry of Culture and Tourism

The Eros Head relief found in London was donated by Marion Olivia Wilson to the Victoria & Albert Museum in 1933 in memory of her father, Charles Wilson.

A plaster copy of the Head of Eros was placed on the giant sarcophagus in the Istanbul Archaeological Museums as a result of the negotiations with the Victoria & Albert Museum officials in the 1930s.

In 2010, as a result of Doctor Şehrazat Karagöz’s research that brought the issue back to the agenda, the Ministry of Culture and Tourism and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs conveyed the issue of exhibiting the Eros Head together with the sarcophagus to the Victoria & Albert Museum.

Photo: Republic of Türkiye Ministry of Culture and Tourism

The cooperation of the Ministry of Culture and Tourism and the Victoria & Albert Museum Director Dr. Tristram Hunt and his team aimed at the protection of cultural assets and their approach to the preservation of cultural assets in situ helped the Eros Head to be restored to its sarcophagus.

With the cooperation protocol signed between the Istanbul Archeology Museum and the Victoria & Albert Museum, the missing piece of the sarcophagus was brought to Turkey and placed in its place.

Republic of Türkiye Ministry of Culture and Tourism

Cover Photo: Republic of Türkiye Ministry of Culture and Tourism

Banner
Related Post

The unknown importance of Göllü Dağ on the route of the first humans’ Transition from Africa to Europe

4 October 2021

4 October 2021

The researches conducted in Göllü Dağ and its surroundings, located within the borders of Niğde province in Central Anatolia, and...

A 3300-year-old seal and a dagger/sword reminiscent of Mycenaean swords were discovered in the Heart of western Anatolia

18 July 2022

18 July 2022

A unique 3300-year-old seal and a sword/dagger reminiscent of Mycenaean swords were unearthed during the excavations of Tavşanlı Höyük (Tavşanlı...

In Lviv, Ukraine, a secret room where Jews were hiding in city sewers during the Nazi Holocaust has been unearthed

7 November 2021

7 November 2021

In the western Ukrainian city of Lviv, diggers have uncovered new hiding spots in underground sewers where some Jews managed...

Archaeologists have discovered a 4,000-year-old burial ground and shell tool processing site in Taiwan

1 August 2022

1 August 2022

A 4,000-year-old cemetery and shell tool processing site has been discovered in Kenting National Park, Taiwan’s oldest and southernmost national...

Karahantepe; It will radically change the way we look at the Neolithic Age

1 June 2022

1 June 2022

Findings on settled village life in the ongoing excavations in Karahantepe will profoundly change our knowledge of the Neolithic Age....

The world’s northernmost Palaeolithic settlement has been discovered on Kotelny Island in the Arctic

20 August 2021

20 August 2021

During the Paleolithic period, hominins lived in tiny groups and subsisted by collecting plants, fishing, and killing or scavenging wild...

The latest discovery at the villa Civita Giuliana, north of Pompeii, the remains of a slave room

7 November 2021

7 November 2021

Ella IDE Pompeii archaeologists announced Saturday the discovery of the remnants of a “slave room” in an exceedingly unusual find...

The Life of the Maya Ambassador Found in El Palmar was not Easy

18 March 2021

18 March 2021

El Palmar is a small plaza compound in Mexico near the borders of Belize and Guatemala. Archaeologists Kenichiro Tsukamoto and...

The Rock Tombs Found by Chance in the Al-Hamidiyah Necropolis

12 May 2021

12 May 2021

A series of rock tombs carved into the slope of a mountain have been discovered in the Al-Hamidiyah necropolis on...

1500-Year-Old Mosaic Saved in illegal Excavation Operation

3 April 2021

3 April 2021

During the illegal excavation operation carried out in Izmir’s Aliağa district, a monastery built during the Roman period and about...

The ‘extraordinary’ Roman mosaic depicting scenes from Homer’s Iliad unearthed in a Rutland farmer’s field is the first of its kind in England

25 November 2021

25 November 2021

The 1,500-year-old mosaic discovered by a farmer was considered Britain’s “most exciting” Roman find. The artwork was discovered on private...

6,000-year-old Finds in Dorset Downs

11 June 2021

11 June 2021

In the Dorset Downs, a significant landscaping project has revealed a plethora of intriguing findings on a grand scale. Excavations...

Archaeologists find the earliest evidence Maya sacred calendar in the Guatemalan pyramid

14 April 2022

14 April 2022

Archaeologists identified two plaster fragments depicting a date that the Maya civilization called ‘7 deer’ and was part of the...

Lovingly gazing mosaics restored in Turkey’s Metropolis

16 October 2021

16 October 2021

In the ancient city of Metropolis in the Torbali district of the western Izmir province, mosaics portraying Eros, the Greek...

Remains of first Islamic madrassa found in Turkey’s Harran

1 December 2021

1 December 2021

The remnants of a 12th-century madrassa (Islamic institution of higher instruction) have been discovered in the archaeological site of Harran,...

Comments
Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.