9 August 2022 The Future is the Product of the Past

Roman Canal and Road Uncovered in The Netherlands near UNESCO heritage sites

Dutch archaeologists that a canal and gravel road thought to have been built and used by the Roman military have been unearthed near the city of Nijmegen in the eastern Netherlands.

The canal and road, which is more than 10 meters (33 feet) wide, were discovered near ancient military camps that were listed this week on UNESCO’s list of World Heritage sites.

According to RAAP, the country’s largest archaeological and cultural history consulting agency, they are believed to have been built and used by the Roman army.

Archaeologist Eric Noord of RAAP told AFP the 33-foot-wide canal probably linked nearby Roman settlements and military bases to the Rhine River in order to transport troops, supplies, and building materials along the border of the Roman Empire.

Nijmegen is located on the Rhine, which was the Roman Empire’s boundary at the time, and the finding was “unique” for that part of the nation.

Eric Noord, who is in charge of the project, told AFP that this Roman highway with the original gravel pavement provided a new perspective on the road network about 2000 years ago.

Nijmegen was, like many other ancient cities, a fact a set of settlements, some of which existed at the same time. The name Nijmegen is derived from Noviomagus, the name of a Roman city in the second and third centuries.

Nijmegen is located on the banks of the Waal, a tributary of the Rhine in the ‘Great Rivers’ area, and is only 10 kilometers from the German border. The city, which is of Roman antiquity (whose name originates from ‘Noviomagus,’ which means ‘new market,’ celebrated its 2000th anniversary in 2005. Nijmegen the oldest city in the Netherlands

The Great Rivers were the Roman Empire’s northern boundary, and no doubt the Romans moved here because of the magnificent strategic view of enemy land across the river. Subsequent monarchs and rulers selected Nijmegen as their place of residence for similar strategic reasons.

Photo: A Roman-era canal was discovered in Oosterhout, in the eastern Netherlands, along with a road, both from around 2,000 years ago ERIC NORDE RAAP/AFP

Banner
Related Post

An 8500-year-old wooden ladder remain was discovered at Çatalhöyük

12 April 2022

12 April 2022

Remains of the wooden ladder were discovered for the first time in Çatalhöyük, one of the best-preserved Neolithic settlements in...

Maya city Tikal put today’s urban gardens to shame

26 June 2021

26 June 2021

The Maya civilization was known for its achievements in art, architecture, mathematics, astronomy, and calendar systems. Tikal, the ancient Maya...

The University of Aberdeen is to Return a Benin Bronze

5 April 2021

5 April 2021

Since Nigeria gained independence in 1960, Nigeria has been calling for the return of stolen Benin bronzes (including brass reliefs,...

The Historical Building Next To The Million Stone Will Sell

6 February 2021

6 February 2021

Everyone has heard of the Million Stone, which was built during the Byzantine Empire and accepted as the zero points...

To The West of Turkey Ancient Quarry Found

28 March 2021

28 March 2021

Turkey is very lucky in terms of ancient settlements. It is home to many unexplored artifacts, along with well-preserved ancient...

World’s Oldest Customer Complaint “at 3800 Years Old”

4 February 2021

4 February 2021

When we are not satisfied with the product we receive, what almost all of us do is complain about the...

Excavations in and around Yazıkaya, one of the monumental works of the Phrygians, start again after 71 years.

23 July 2022

23 July 2022

Archaeological excavations at Midas Castle in Yazılıkaya Midas Valley in the Han district of Eskişehir, located in northwest Turkey, will...

Central Turkey’s largest Byzantine mosaic structure found

28 October 2021

28 October 2021

A 300-square-meter (3,330 square feet) ​floor mosaic belonging to the Late Roman-Early Byzantine period was discovered during excavation work in...

Interesting discovery at Crowland digs, a human poo from the Saxon period or coprolite found

16 August 2021

16 August 2021

Excavations in Abbey Church Field in Crowland, near Peterborough, have also yielded such amazing finds results for archaeologists. The archaeological...

Archaeologists have discovered a 4,000-year-old burial ground and shell tool processing site in Taiwan

1 August 2022

1 August 2022

A 4,000-year-old cemetery and shell tool processing site has been discovered in Kenting National Park, Taiwan’s oldest and southernmost national...

The remains of a very uncommon’ dinosaur species have been discovered in Brazil

20 November 2021

20 November 2021

Researchers have uncovered the remains of a toothless, two-legged dinosaur species that lived 70 million years ago in Brazil, calling...

Khufu Boat moved to its New Museum by Smart Vehicle

8 August 2021

8 August 2021

A 4,600-year-old intact wooden boat bearing the name of an Egyptian pharaoh, Khufu, was transported to a new museum about...

Construction Workers Discovered Ancient Sarcophagus in Turkey

2 March 2021

2 March 2021

On Monday, reports said that during excavations in the Seyitgazi region of Eskisehir Province in northwestern Turkey, municipal staff unexpectedly...

Unique Scythian glass pendants found in the Poltava region of Ukraine

8 October 2021

8 October 2021

Archaeologists have unearthed unique amphora-shaped pendants near the town of Kotelva in the Poltava oblast of central Ukraine. A team...

Greek Warrior Relief Found in Bulgaria

2 April 2021

2 April 2021

In Sozopol, on the Bulgarian Black Sea coast, a piece of terracotta relief depicting ancient Greek warriors has been discovered....

Comments
Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.