29 September 2022 The Future is the Product of the Past

Medieval double grave discovered with majestic objects inside the circular ditch

An early medieval double grave was discovered in Kirchheim am Neckar Friedrichstrasse, southern Germany, during excavations supervised by the State Office for the Preservation of Monuments (LAD) at the district council in Stuttgart and carried out by the company AAB.

Two plots of land in Kirchheim’s cultural monument area were excavated in advance of development. The presence of a burial ground had been known since the nineteenth century but the discovery of a double grave inside a ring ditch was unprecedented.

A circular mark on the floor indicated an earlier burial mound with a very large cemetery. The circular mark on the ground was all that remains of a large tumulus. The burials consist of two adjacent wooden chamber graves built over carved rock. One belonged to a woman, and the other to a man. Both of the graves had previously been plunder, but the tomb raiders only plunder from the knees up. Looters really missed out because the areas below the knees were unspoiled.

A bronze vessel filled with organic material and animal bone.
A bronze vessel filled with organic material and animal bone. Photo: Landesamt für Denkmalpflege im Regierungspräsidium Stuttgart/Bilder: AAB, Stephan Weber

Below the foot of the buried man were a large ornate bone comb, silver sheet bands, a ceramic pot, a glass tumbler, horse bridles and a bronze vessel filled with organic material and animal bone and a large egg-like object beneath a ceramic bowl.

A gold coin was also found as an obolus in the dead man’s mouth (The coin is known as Charon’s obol in Greek and Latin literature, and it was used as a payment or bribe for Charon, the ferryman who transported souls across the river that separated the worlds of the living and the worlds of the dead.)

Despite being looted, the woman’s burial was also lavishly furnished. Grave goods found in her grave include a pearl necklace, a gold necklace inlaid with almandine, a disc brooch, a woven sword, scissors, a glass beaker, and a chatelaine with a decorative disc and a Cypraea snail shell hanging from it. These were high-value objects, jewelry, and household goods alike. The Cypraea was imported from the Indian Ocean and was a very expensive charm to hang from a belt.

Photo: Landesamt für Denkmalpflege im Regierungspräsidium Stuttgart/Bilder: AAB, Stephan Weber

A decapitated horse’s remains were buried just outside the ring ditch. The presence of horse bridles in the man’s grave suggests that the horse was buried alongside the burial.

Excavation of 22 more graves was found on the two properties. It is thought that the entire cemetery probably originally consisted of several hundred graves.

Regierungspräsidium Stuttgart

Banner
Related Post

Salt May Have Been Used as Money in Exchanges

24 March 2021

24 March 2021

Salt has always been a precious metal. Salt was needed in many areas, from the preservation of food to the...

Archaeologists have discovered the origins a Herefordshire Stone Age monument

22 August 2021

22 August 2021

Archaeologists have finally uncovered the mysterious origins of Arthur’s Stone, named after the mysterious legends of King Arthur, who inspired...

Archaeologists unearth 600,000-year-old evidence of Britain’s early inhabitants

22 June 2022

22 June 2022

New finds have indicated that some of Britain’s earliest people lived in the Canterbury suburbs. According to the research, led...

7,800-year-old female figurine discovered in Ulucak Höyük in western Turkey

8 August 2022

8 August 2022

A 7,800-year-old female figurine was found in the Ulucak Höyük (Ulucak Mound) in the Kemalpaşa district of Izmir. It was...

Nearly intact 1,800-year-old bouquets of flowers found in Teotihuacan

14 August 2021

14 August 2021

In the ruined city of Teotihuacan, Mexico, at a depth of 18 meters, inside the tunnel under the pyramid of...

A 2,000-year-old ancient “mirror” throws light on aristocratic life in China

17 May 2022

17 May 2022

Archeologists in Beijing have successfully reconstructed a 2,000-year-ago dressing mirror once cherished by the high nobility during the Han Dynasty....

2100-year-old women skeleton found lying in bronze ‘Mermaid Bed’

4 June 2022

4 June 2022

Archaeologists have discovered the 2100-year-old skeleton of a woman lying in a bronze ‘Mermaid Bed’ near the city of Kozani...

Google Earth Helped Archaeologists Make İmportant Discoveries in Leicestershire

26 April 2021

26 April 2021

After Google Earth revealed traces of underground structures, archaeologists digging at a Roman settlement in Leicestershire say they have made...

Rock tombs dating back 1,800 years have been discovered in Turkey’s ancient city of Blaundus

1 October 2021

1 October 2021

In the ancient city of Blaundus, located in the Ulubey neighborhood of the western Anatolian city of Uşak, 400 rock-cut...

World’s Smallest Stegosaurus Track Found

14 March 2021

14 March 2021

The smallest trace of stegosaurus in the world that lived 155 million years ago was found. Stegosaurus, a herbivorous dinosaur,...

An 1800-year-old inscription was discovered in Hadrianaupolis indicating the existence of the Asclepius cult

5 September 2022

5 September 2022

An inscription pointing to the existence of the cult of Asclepius was found in the ancient city of Hadrianaupolis, which...

Cosmic cataclysm 1,500 years ago may have caused downfall of the Hopewell Culture

3 February 2022

3 February 2022

Researchers at the University of Cincinnati find evidence of cosmic cataclysm 1,500 years ago at 11 ancient sites in three...

From Researchers, a New İnterpretation of Norse Religion

26 February 2021

26 February 2021

Recent research on pre-Christian Norse religions shows that the variation in Norse religions is far greater than previously imagined. Ten...

Pompeii Reopening Antiquarium

6 February 2021

6 February 2021

The Antiquarium, a permanent museum within the Pompeii Archaeological pact, reopens. Opened in 1873, the Antiquarium was bombed during World...

Climate Change Negatively Impacts 45 000-year-old Cave Paintings in Indonesia

13 May 2021

13 May 2021

Cave paintings from 20,000 to 50,000 years ago in Indonesia are in danger of extinction due to climate change. Indonesia...

Comments
Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.