1 February 2023 The Future is the Product of the Past

World-first recreation of ancient Egyptian garden open

Have you ever wondered what an ancient Egyptian garden was like?  This is your opportunity to find out! The first ancient Egyptian garden in the world has been recreated and is now open to the public.

The Hamilton Gardens in New Zealand are giving visitors an opportunity to step 4,000 years back in time, explore the sacred plants of the Pharaohs and imagine you have come to ensure your soul will have safe passage through the dangers of the underworld into the promises of the afterlife.

The ancient Egyptian Temple Garden one of 18 themed gardens telling the history of gardening and civilizations over the ages at the Hamilton Gardens.

The Temple Garden at Hamilton Gardens is based on a typical temple from the Middle Kingdom period (2040 BCE to 1782 BCE). Temple gardens produced floral, vegetable, and fruit offerings for these sacred rituals. They grew the plants used in perfumes for anointing statues to the gods and garlands of flowers for religious processions.

Ancient Egyptians would not have been able to go into a temple garden as it was only for royalty and priests. A typical temple garden had a rectangular pool surrounded by a range of plants. They included pergolas covered in grapevines and has rows of trees planted alongside.

Photo: Hamilton Gardens

Symbolism was a key feature of these gardens (as it was in all of Ancient Egypt). In addition to highly recognisable hieroglyphics, many individual elements of these temple courts were also symbolic.

“For ancient Egyptians, life on earth was a preparation for the dangerous journey into the afterlife. Temples and their gardens were a meeting place between heaven, earth, and the underworld,” said Lucy Ryan, Hamilton Gardens director.

With their famed belief in the afterlife, two false doors to the side of the temple (where only the highest priests were allowed to enter) provided an exit point for spirits traveling onwards.

The new garden is part of the “Productive Garden collection” that addresses aspects of the relationship between people and plants.

Hamilton Gardens Director Lucy Ryan says she believes Hamilton Gardens is the first to recreate an Ancient Egyptian Garden
Hamilton Gardens Director Lucy Ryan says she believes Hamilton Gardens is the first to recreate an Ancient Egyptian Garden. Photo: Hamilton gardens

Thorough research was carried out when planning the recreation of this garden. Dr. Peter Sergel,​ the man who envisaged and designed the garden.

As part of his research, Sergel traveled to Egypt in 2018 and also drew on the expertise of Egyptologists at Oxford University and in New Zealand.

“We know what colors were used due to research on sealed tombs and chemical analysis, and they really were this bright,” Sergel said.

“On the outside, the pharaoh was making a statement to the public. But inside, it’s about what the pharaoh wants the gods to know about him. If you analyze this garden, it’s all about the afterlife. It’s a place for spirits and gods,” said Sergel.

“Our garden is probably a pretty modest garden compared to the ones they had,” Sergel said.

Artist Jeremy Shirley adds the final touches to the Ancient Egyptian Garden ahead of its official opening.
Artist Jeremy Shirley adds the final touches to the Ancient Egyptian Garden ahead of its official opening. Photo: KELLY HODEL/STUFF

“Some of them were huge. Twenty women could row the pharaoh around in the pool. We know about Egyptians as builders of pyramids and temples and as fantastic artists. But they were also brilliant horticulturalists. Egypt was considered the breadbasket of the Roman Empire.”

“Hamilton Gardens tells the story of humankind and this garden reflects one of the first big steps in civilization, a belief system bringing communities together,” Sergel said.

Hamilton Gardens is free for all visitors and open 10 am to 5 pm every day.

Banner
Related Post

In the city of Gods and Goddesses Magnesia, Zeus Temple’s entrance gate found

26 September 2021

26 September 2021

During an excavation in the ancient city of Magnesia, located in the Ortaklar district of Germencik in Turkey’s Aegean province...

A large hall from the time of Viking Harald Bluetooth discovered

26 December 2022

26 December 2022

A large hall from the reign of King Harald Bluetooth of Denmark and Norway was unearthed during housing construction work...

In Russia, archaeologists 2100-Year-Old Medallion of Goddess Aphrodite and a warrior tomb unearthed

30 October 2022

30 October 2022

Archaeologists have unearthed a silver medallion depicting the Greek goddess Aphrodite (Roma Venüs) in a 2100-year-old grave of a priestess...

New Evidence could Change the Date People First Arrived in North America

2 June 2021

2 June 2021

While investigating the origins of agriculture, researchers made an unexpected discovery. According to an unexpected finding made by an Iowa...

Archaeologists have discovered a 2800-year-old Urartian Castle in eastern Turkey

17 June 2021

17 June 2021

Archaeologists discovered the ruins of a castle going back 2,800 years on a mountain 2,500 meters (8,200 feet) above sea...

Falaj al Misfah: Working for a thousand years

26 September 2021

26 September 2021

The village of Al Misfah Abriyeen is known for its lush oasis, magnificent orchards, and year-round water source, the ‘aflaj.’...

Women May Have Ruled El Algar in the Bronze Age

12 March 2021

12 March 2021

The diadem found in the Bronze Age tomb belonging to the El Algar culture may have belonged to a queen....

The free online course from the Colchester Museums and University of Reading Department of Archeology

12 July 2021

12 July 2021

The opportunity to be among the first to examine 2,000-year-old cremated remains from Roman Britain and learn about the origins...

Sidamara, the largest sarcophagus of the Ancient World, got Eros relief 140 years later

1 July 2022

1 July 2022

The Sidamara Sarcophagus, which is considered to be one of the largest sarcophagi of the ancient world and weighs many...

Archaeologists have unearthed two early Aksumite Churches in Africa

11 December 2022

11 December 2022

New discoveries in the port city of Adulis on Eritrea’s Red Sea coast show that two ancient churches discovered more...

An 1800-year-old geometric patterned mosaic was discovered in Turkey’s ancient city of Bergama

17 June 2022

17 June 2022

During excavations surrounding the Red Basilica at Pergamon, an ancient city in western Turkey that is a UNESCO World Heritage...

Medieval Ring with a Skull Emblem Found in Wales and The Gold Coins are Declared Treasure

11 April 2021

11 April 2021

Located in wales nine treasure finds dating from the medieval and post-medieval periods have been declared treasure. Metal detectors in...

Researchers may have found the wreck of British explorer James Cook’s Endeavour

3 February 2022

3 February 2022

The wreck of Captain James Cook’s famed vessel the Endeavour has been found off the coast of the U.S. state...

Rare Ancient Bone Game found in Israel “Astragali”

18 August 2022

18 August 2022

Archaeologists have found a rare assemblage of animal knucklebones known as astragali used in ancient Greek games and divination in...

Archaeologists unearth 600,000-year-old evidence of Britain’s early inhabitants

22 June 2022

22 June 2022

New finds have indicated that some of Britain’s earliest people lived in the Canterbury suburbs. According to the research, led...

Comments
Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *