27 January 2022 The Future is the Product of the Past

The Ancient City of Miletos’s “Sacred Cave” Opened to Visitors

In the ancient city of Miletos, which had an important place in the advancement of philosophy, art, and science in Antiquity, the “sacred cave” belonging to the cult of Asclepius, the god of health, was opened to visitors.

The Ancient City of Miletos is an ancient port city in 20 miles (30 km) south of the present city of Aydın, Turkey, on the coast of western Turkey. It lies near the mouth of the Büyükmenderes River.

About the “sacred cave” in Miletos Ancient City, Aydın Provincial Culture and Tourism Director Umut Tuncer told reporters that the existence of the cave under the theater in the ancient city was forgotten over time due to the vegetation in front of it and the closing of the way to enter.

Tuncer stated that after the discovery made during the excavations, work was carried out in the cave and it was estimated that the water, which was believed to be sacred in the past, was found in the cave. Tuncer said now that this water could not be reached.

The Ancient City of Miletos sacred cave
Photo: Ferdi Uzun/AA

Head of the Miletos Ancient City Excavations Committee, Prof Dr. Christof Berns from the Department of Archeology at the University of Hamburg, explained that they found that the rocks were processed in the cave, which is a natural formation, in the 3rd century BC, and added, “We found votive objects in the cave. That’s why we think it’s a holy place.” he said.

Miletos Museum Director Baran Aydın gave the following information about the cave:

The reason why it is called a “sacred cave” is that there are some traces of the cult of Asklepios, known as the god of health. Sculpture fragments were found. Just like the drinks that heal people from various diseases in Bergama Asklepion, the existence of using water can be considered. Maybe the front of the theater was the harbor at that time. Perhaps the arriving sailors were receiving treatment here. Although these are of course question marks, some of the historical artifacts we have give strong clues in this direction.”

Miletus, founded by the Greeks on the coast of western Anatolia, is remembered in history as the birthplace of mathematician Thales, as well as Anaxagoras and Anaximander, two prominent philosophers. Miletus was also one of Ionia’s oldest and most significant Greek towns, with four harbors to its credit.

Source: AA

Banner
Related Post

In Poland’s “Death Valley,” new evidence of Nazi atrocities

18 August 2021

18 August 2021

In October 1939, between 30,000 and 35,000 Polish intellectuals, Polish civilians, Jews and Czechs, and German prisoners from psychiatric institutions...

The Worst Torture Device in History “Brazen Bull”

2 February 2021

2 February 2021

Agrigentum Tyranny today is in the provincial borders of Agrigento in the Sicily Autonomous Region in the southwest of Sicily....

Ancient Hippodrome, Subject of Ben-Hur Movie, Will Become “Arkeo Sports Park”

8 August 2021

8 August 2021

Ben-Hur, a wealthy prince living in Jerusalem, is a historical figure who struggled for the freedom of the Jews during...

Viking Ship Burials Shrouded in Mystery on Danish Island

25 May 2021

25 May 2021

Archaeologists studying the origins and makeup of the Kalvestene burial field, a famed place in Scandinavian legend, have undertaken new...

Environmentalists react to the rehabilitation works in the Assos ancient port

2 October 2021

2 October 2021

Among the continuing landscaping and restoration works at the historic city of Assos in the northern province of Canakkale, a...

Thousand-Year-Old Christian Viking-era Graves Found in Sweden

28 June 2021

28 June 2021

Seven Christian tombs dating to the Viking Age have been found at Sigtuna. According to archaeologists, the tombs date to...

Climate has influenced the growth of our bodies and our brain

8 July 2021

8 July 2021

Over 300 fossils from the genus Homo have been measured for body and brain size by an interdisciplinary team of...

Denisovans or Homo Sapiens: Who Were the First to Settle Permanently on the Tibetan Plateau?

8 December 2021

8 December 2021

The Tibetan Plateau has long been considered one of the last places to be populated by people in their migration...

In Moravia, archaeologists discover divine thrones, thousands of artifacts and a new settlement

13 August 2021

13 August 2021

During a four-year dig in the Moravian city (Czech Republic) of Perov, rare gems, mysterious burial places, and divine thrones...

40 Skeletons in Giant Jars Found in the Corsica Necropolis

16 May 2021

16 May 2021

Archaeologists working on the French island of Corsica discovered around 40 ancient graves where persons were buried inside gigantic jars...

Was the mystery of Noceto Vasca Votiva the water ritual?

13 June 2021

13 June 2021

The Noceto Vasca Votiva is a one-of-a-kind wood building discovered in 2005 on a tiny hill in northern Italy. The...

Archaeologists have unearthed a flawless Roman blue glass bowl in the Dutch city of Nijmegen

23 January 2022

23 January 2022

Archaeologists excavating the site of a comprehensive housing and green space development in Nijmegen’s Winkelsteeg, one of the oldest cities...

Turkey’s Must-See Ancient Cities

23 March 2021

23 March 2021

From the classical cities scattered on the coast to the earliest archaeological sites that can be traced back to human...

Archaeologists find sunken ancient Egyptian warship under Abu Qir Bay

26 July 2021

26 July 2021

According to a press release by the Egyptian Ministry of Tourism and Antiquities, the Egyptian French archaeological mission of the...

Two rock chambers thought to be dining rooms unearthed at ‘House of Muses’ in southeastern Turkey

27 July 2021

27 July 2021

House of Muses, a Roman-era house named after the muse mosaics found in the area located in the ancient city...

Comments
Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *