16 August 2022 The Future is the Product of the Past

New Dead Sea Scrolls in The Horror Cave

On Tuesday, Israeli archaeologists revealed dozens of recently discovered fragments of Bible text, the Dead Sea Scrolls, which were based on ancient Jewish religious manuscripts first discovered 60 years ago.

In an astonishingly rare discovery, in a daring rescue operation, about twelve biblical scrolls with a history of 2,000 years were excavated from a cave in the Judah desert. The newly discovered scroll fragment is a Greek translation of Zechariah and Nahum in the Twelve Little Prophets, written by two scribes. Only the name of God is written in Hebrew in the texts.

Israel’s antiquities authorities said the parchment pieces feature lines of Greek text from the books of Zechariah and Nahum that have been radiocarbon dated to the 2nd century AD.

More than 20 fragments were found in the so-called horror cave of Nahal Hever, which is located about 80 meters (260 feet) below the top of the cliff. According to a press release from the Israel Antiquities Administration, the cave was named because “it is surrounded by a canyon and can only be reached by descending rapidly on a steep cliff.”

The discovery also included a collection of millennial rare coins, a 6,000-year-old skeleton of a child – possibly a woman, mummified in a piece of cloth – and a large 10,500-year-old basket that experts believe may be the oldest in the world.

“These finds are not just important to our own cultural heritage, but to that of the entire world,” said Avi Cohen, CEO of the Ministry of Jerusalem and Heritage, which was involved in the excavation.

“The scroll fragments containing biblical texts, the coins, and the additional funds from the Second Temple Period that were found in this unique project directly attest to the Jewish heritage of the region and the inseparable bond between the Jewish cultural activities and our place in this land,” he added.

A piece of previously discovered dead sea scrolls
A piece of previously discovered dead sea scrolls. EPA

It is believed that these artworks were hidden in the cave during the Bar Kochba Revolt, an armed Jewish uprising against Rome during the reign of Emperor Hadrian from 132 to 136 AD.

Since 2017, the national archaeological project has been called the defense project against the looting of antiquities, and the project has been carried out in the caves and ravines of the Judean Desert. The project was funded by the Israel Antiquities Administration, the Archaeology Department of the Judean Civil Administration, and Samaria, and was funded by the Jerusalem Affairs and Heritage Ministry.

“The desert team showed exceptional courage, dedication and devotion to purpose, rappelling down to caves located between heaven and earth, digging and sifting through them, enduring thick and suffocating dust, and returning with gifts of immeasurable worth for mankind,” said Israel Antiquities Authority’s director Israel Hasson, who led the widespread rescue operation, in an IAA press release.

“The newly discovered scroll fragments are a wake-up call to the state. Resources must be allocated for the completion of this historically important operation. We must ensure that we recover all the data that has not yet been discovered in the caves before the robbers do. Some things are beyond value,” Hasson said.

The Dead Sea Scrolls, a collection of Jewish texts, were first encountered by Bedouin shepherds in desert caves in the West Bank, near the Dead Sea and the ancient city of Qumran, in 1946. Bedouins had hung the scrolls on a pole earlier. their existence was discovered by a Jewish professor at the Hebrew University.

During the 1940s and 1950s, continuous excavations in the Qumran area and beyond yielded additional manuscripts and fragments that eventually became known as the Dead Sea Scrolls.

These fragments, mainly on parchment as well as papyrus pieces, are believed to date from the 3rd century BC. to the 1st century AD and contain the earliest known copies of the Hebrew Bible and documentation of the ascetic Jewish sect that existed in Jesus’ day.

Banner
Related Post

Incredible Mayan Inventions and Achievements

31 July 2022

31 July 2022

The Mayans excelled at agriculture, pottery, writing, calendars, and arithmetic, leaving an incredible quantity of spectacular architecture and symbolic artwork...

Over 1,600-yr-old tomb of embracing lovers found in north China

16 August 2021

16 August 2021

Archaeologists recently published a study of the tomb of cuddling lovers, dating to the Northern Wei Dynasty (386-534), more than...

The unknown importance of Göllü Dağ on the route of the first humans’ Transition from Africa to Europe

4 October 2021

4 October 2021

The researches conducted in Göllü Dağ and its surroundings, located within the borders of Niğde province in Central Anatolia, and...

Archaeologists Unearthed Third Greatest Fire Temple Existing in Ancient Iran’s Sassanid Era

11 July 2022

11 July 2022

Archaeologists have unearthed ruins of what they believe to be the third-greatest fire temple in ancient Iran during the Sassanid...

1900 years old funerary altar of a teenage girl discovered in Rome

9 May 2022

9 May 2022

A funerary altar indicating the location of the remains of Valeria, a 13-year-old girl who died in the 2nd century...

An 1800-year-old geometric patterned mosaic was discovered in Turkey’s ancient city of Bergama

17 June 2022

17 June 2022

During excavations surrounding the Red Basilica at Pergamon, an ancient city in western Turkey that is a UNESCO World Heritage...

Rare gladiator tombs were discovered in the Ancient City of Anavarza in southern Türkiye

10 August 2022

10 August 2022

Archaeologists have discovered rare gladiator tombs in the ancient city of Anavarza, known as the “Invincible city” in history, which...

Iraq’s historic Arch of Ctesiphon undergoes restoration work

28 November 2021

28 November 2021

Iraq’s Arch of Ctesiphon, the world’s largest brick-built arch, is having restoration work to return it to its former splendour,...

Archaeologists Unearth Cisterns at Izmir’s Ancient “City of Mother Goddess”

2 June 2021

2 June 2021

In the ancient city of Metropolis, in western Turkey, in the province of Izmir, something that played an important role...

Climate Change Negatively Impacts 45 000-year-old Cave Paintings in Indonesia

13 May 2021

13 May 2021

Cave paintings from 20,000 to 50,000 years ago in Indonesia are in danger of extinction due to climate change. Indonesia...

Archaeologists find rare treasure in Suzdal of Russia

15 August 2021

15 August 2021

The twentieth season of fieldwork brought an unexpected discovery to the Institute of Archeology of the Russian Academy of Sciences....

Ancient gypsum furniture was discovered in a fire temple in the ancient region of Vigol in Iran

1 June 2021

1 June 2021

Sets of gypsum furniture, including a carved table and chairs, were discovered during an archaeological dig in central Iran. According...

4 Aztec child burials unearthed in Mexico and dated to the Early Colonial period may be indicators of Aztec resistance

6 July 2022

6 July 2022

During an archaeological rescue effort in Mexico City’s historic central district of La Lagunilla, the remains of an Aztec house...

Unique semi-mummified body tomb discovered in Pompeii

17 August 2021

17 August 2021

A semi-mummified skeleton was discovered in the Porta Sarno necropolis, which is located east of Pompeii’s city center and is...

Scientists Use Artificial İntelligence to Study Ancient Australian Rock Art

1 April 2021

1 April 2021

Rock art is the oldest surviving human art form. Throughout Australia, petroglyphs are part of the life and customs of...

Comments
Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.