27 October 2021 The Future is the Product of the Past

‘Miniature Pompeii’ found beneath Astra cinema in Verona

Archaeologists have uncovered a “miniature Pompeii” in the shape of a well-preserved ancient edifice near Verona, Italy.

An old Roman structure has been discovered during excavations at a defunct cinema in Verona, northern Italy, in what has been characterized as a “miniature Pompeii.” The finding was uncovered during excavations in the basement of the Astra cinema, which is being renovated after being abandoned for more than 20 years.

The structure’s “magnificent frescoed walls,” which have survived mostly unaltered for over 2,000 years, “evokes a tiny Pompeii,” according to Verona’s archaeological superintendent.

Experts are currently not sure what the purpose of the building, which dates back to the 2nd century when the Romans ruled. Experts said it had survived the fire because the roof had collapsed and charred wooden furniture was among the finds.

“A fire seems to have put an end to the attendance of the complex,” the superintendent said.

Experts found items of charred wooden furniture among the remains in the old Astra cinema.
Experts found items of charred wooden furniture among the remains in the old Astra cinema.

Despite the fire, “the environment was preserved intact, with the magnificent colours of the frescoed walls dating back to the second century”.

The discovery and evidence of the fire evoke the meaning of the ancient city of Pompeii, which was destroyed by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in AD 79. “A calamitous event, in this case, a fire, suddenly marked the end of the complex, leaving traces,” the report added.

The discovery and the fact it survived a fire left archaeologists reminiscent of the city of Pompeii. Undoubtedly, what happened in Pompeii was far more frightening.

Cover Photo: ANSA

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