27 October 2021 The Future is the Product of the Past

İnscriptions in Turkey is Showing How Romans Tackled İnflation

The largest marble city in the world, located in western Turkey in the province of Muğla, draws attention with large inscriptions depicting traces of various civilizations on the wall of the 2,000-year-old city council hall, also known as bouleuterion.

Stratonikeia, located in the Yatağan district of Muğla, has been home to many civilizations throughout its history and is listed on the temporary World Heritage List by UNESCO. It is one of the largest marble cities in the world. Since 1977, excavation work has continued.

This ancient city was influenced by the Greek, Roman, Byzantine, and Anatolian beyliks (main periods), and it continued to play an important role in the Ottoman and Republican eras.

Speaking to Anadolu Agency (AA), Bilal Söğüt, the head of the Stratonikeia excavations, said that there are Latin inscriptions on the outer part of the northern walls of the bouleuterion in Stratonikeia, Greek inscriptions on the inner side of the same wall, and Ottoman inscriptions on the outer part of the Southern Wall.

He noted that one of the inscriptions in Greek that dates back to the Hellenistic period is a calendar.

He explained that the calendar was made by Manippos, a native of Stratonikeia and that it was used to mark the days over the 12 months of the year in 1505, adding that: “If we were using this calendar, we would have been around 3500s.”

The Latin inscriptions, meanwhile, show what goods were sold in Stratonikeia in the Roman period and their price ceiling about 1720 years ago.

A Latin inscription in the ancient city of Stratonikeia.
A Latin inscription in the ancient city of Stratonikeia. Photo: AA

“To keep inflation under control, a price ceiling list was regulated,” Söğüt said.

Noting that the list including more than 200 products is an indicator that the society at the time was attempting to tackle inflation, he added: “In fact, the system in which producers and consumers were supported at that time is directly mentioned here.”

“This inscription is also very important for us in terms of the large area it covers. We preserve the most beautiful example of the inscription in Anatolia, which covers an area of approximately 23 square meters (248 square feet). The whole inscription stands on the walls of the city council hall,” he told.

He emphasized that careful works were carried out to unearth these inscriptions.

The Bouleuterion in the center of the city was built along the east-west direction and has a rectangular plane. According to architectural elements and decorations, the history of the building can be traced back to the second half of the first century BC.

The Stratonikeia, which has hosted many civilizations from antiquity to the present day, is one of the most important archaeological sites in Asia Minor and has unique features.

Cover Photo: AA

Banner
Related Post

3500-year-old ceramic oven discovered in Turkey’s Tepecik Mound

24 August 2021

24 August 2021

A 3,500-year-old ceramic oven was unearthed in Tepecik Mound in the Çine district of Aydın, in western Turkey. Tepecik Höyük,...

1500-year-old Medallion Rescued From Treasure Hunters on Display in Çorum Museum

3 May 2021

3 May 2021

A 1,500-year-old gold medallion portraying a figure of Jesus Christ has been exhibited at a museum in Turkey’s northern province...

New fortifications unearthed in Porsuk Mound excavations

11 August 2021

11 August 2021

In the excavations of Porsuk Mound, which is an important Hittite settlement and where traces of settlement remains can be...

The 3,000-Year-Old Ancient City is Under Danger

8 February 2021

8 February 2021

For the port planned to be built in Izmir’s Aliağa district, a part of the 3,000-year-old ancient city is in...

Archaeologists have discovered a 2800-year-old Urartian Castle in eastern Turkey

17 June 2021

17 June 2021

Archaeologists discovered the ruins of a castle going back 2,800 years on a mountain 2,500 meters (8,200 feet) above sea...

Roman Canal and Road Uncovered in The Netherlands near UNESCO heritage sites

30 July 2021

30 July 2021

Dutch archaeologists that a canal and gravel road thought to have been built and used by the Roman military have...

700-Year-Old Church Becomes a Museum

31 January 2021

31 January 2021

It was learned that the 7-century-old church in Akçaabat, Trabzon will serve as a museum from now on. St. The...

The museum’s “Oscar” Awards had Received this Year by the Troy Museum and the Odunpazarı Modern Museum

11 May 2021

11 May 2021

At the European Museum of the Year Awards (EMYA) online ceremony on May 6, Turkey’s renowned Troy Museum and Odunpazar...

Are Istanbul’s First Hosts Really Megarians?

14 February 2021

14 February 2021

When it comes to the first establishment of Istanbul, the first to come to mind are the stories of Megarians...

Trian Fountain to Be Revived After 1900 Years

17 April 2021

17 April 2021

The Trian fountain in the ancient city of Laodikeia in Denizli will be revived after 1900 years. CHP’s Merkezefendi Municipality...

Archaeologists Reveal a Hair Style They Think Was Fashion 2000 Years Ago

19 February 2021

19 February 2021

The small 5 cm figurine found during excavations at Wimpole in Cambridgeshire surprised with its details. National Trust archaeologists and...

A Roman sarcophagus containing two skeletons was found in Bath, England

29 June 2021

29 June 2021

Stone walls, a Roman sarcophagus, and a cremation burial have been unearthed in a renovation project at the Bathwick Roman...

1000-Year-Old Tomb Found in Perre Ancient City in southeast Turkey

1 July 2021

1 July 2021

A 1,000-year-old tomb was unearthed in the ancient city of Perre in Adiyaman province. Perre is one of the five...

Underwater excavations start at 1,700-year-old ancient Black Sea port Kerpe

20 September 2021

20 September 2021

The traces of the ancient harbor on the Black Sea coast of Kerpe, in Kocaeli’s Kandıra district, are being brought...

Ancient ceremonial chariot found in Pompeii

27 February 2021

27 February 2021

The Archaeological Park announced that a gorgeous Roman chariot was found “almost intact” near Pompeii, where it was buried, calling...

Comments
Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *