25 May 2022 The Future is the Product of the Past

6,000-year-old Finds in Dorset Downs

In the Dorset Downs, a significant landscaping project has revealed a plethora of intriguing findings on a grand scale.

Excavations ahead of the works revealed a Roman settlement, as well as Neolithic and Bronze Age, finds. The oldest artifacts were flint tools and pottery from about 4,000 BC.

More than 25 archaeologists have unearthed convincing evidence of human activity in the region stretching back 6,000 years, barely 20 months after National Grid began work on its Dorset Visual Impact Provision (VIP) project just outside Dorchester in 2018.

By dismantling 22 pylons and replacing an 8.8km length of overhead line with subterranean cables in the villages of Winterbourne Abbas, Winterbourne Steepleton, Martinstown, and Friar Waddon, National Grid’s VIP project will enhance vistas of the Dorset Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB). It’s one of the first projects in the world to remove existing high-voltage electricity transmission infrastructure solely to enhance the landscape.

A corn drying oven was discovered among buildings at a Roman settlement
A corn drying oven was discovered among buildings at a Roman settlement. Photo: OXFORD ARCHAEOLOGY

Work concluded last month and initial results are being revealed in a series of webinars hosted by the National Grid.

At one of the sites, they discovered eight late Roman eight stone buildings, as well as a corn dryer, two enormous malting ovens, and  several millstones that would have required livestock, water, or slave labor to operate.

A bone textile comb
A bone textile comb, thought to be from the Iron Age, was found in the settlement. Photo: OXFORD ARCHAEOLOGY

Archaeologists also found 34 burials accompanied by Iron Age pottery, suggesting the site was occupied for about 500 years.

The investigations, which involved Historic England, the Dorset AONB Partnership and the Dorset county archaeologist, also revealed a cremation cemetery, believed to be Bronze Age, and 11 barrows – or burial mounds.

Oxford Archaeology senior project manager John Boothroyd said, although the archaeological potential of the sites had been assessed during pre-construction works, “it didn’t stop the scale of the archaeological remains identified far exceeding our expectations”.

human burials
Initial trial trenches revealed seven human burials from the mid-sixth century. Photo: OXFORD ARCHAEOLOGY

Analysing and recording the thousands of finds is expected to take up to two years.

National Grid lead project manager Paul Hamnett said: “The scale of the archaeology work is incredible. This is a scheme designed to enhance the landscape and enrich local experience. We are looking forward to sharing what we’ve discovered.”

The Dorset Visual Impact Provision project involves the removal of 22 pylons from the area which is designated as a landscape of national importance.

Dorset AONB is the fifth largest in the UK. It stretches from Lyme Regis to Poole Harbour and inland to Blandford.

Cover Photo: NATIONAL GRID

Source: Dorsetecho

Banner
Related Post

Remarkable Roman mosaic discovered near London Bridge in Southwark

22 February 2022

22 February 2022

A team of archaeologists from the Museum of London Archaeology have announced the discovery well-preserved Roman mosaic that may have...

409 silver coins, found in the Mleiha area of Sharjah, were inspired by Alexander the Great and the Seleucid dynasty

17 July 2021

17 July 2021

409 silver coins dating to the 3rd century have been found in the Mleiha area of Sharjah in the United...

A Roman sarcophagus containing two skeletons was found in Bath, England

29 June 2021

29 June 2021

Stone walls, a Roman sarcophagus, and a cremation burial have been unearthed in a renovation project at the Bathwick Roman...

Environmentalists react to the rehabilitation works in the Assos ancient port

2 October 2021

2 October 2021

Among the continuing landscaping and restoration works at the historic city of Assos in the northern province of Canakkale, a...

Mummy of Egyptian pharaoh Amenhotep ‘unwrapped’ for the first time in 3,500 years!

30 December 2021

30 December 2021

Egyptian scientists have digitally unwrapped the 3,500-year-old mummy of pharaoh Amenhotep I. For the first time, a team in Egypt...

Archaeologists find sunken ancient Egyptian warship under Abu Qir Bay

26 July 2021

26 July 2021

According to a press release by the Egyptian Ministry of Tourism and Antiquities, the Egyptian French archaeological mission of the...

3500-year-old ceramic oven discovered in Turkey’s Tepecik Mound

24 August 2021

24 August 2021

A 3,500-year-old ceramic oven was unearthed in Tepecik Mound in the Çine district of Aydın, in western Turkey. Tepecik Höyük,...

Pompeii Reopening Antiquarium

6 February 2021

6 February 2021

The Antiquarium, a permanent museum within the Pompeii Archaeological pact, reopens. Opened in 1873, the Antiquarium was bombed during World...

Traces of a 3,600-year-old settlement have been discovered in Qatar’s desert

8 February 2022

8 February 2022

Researchers looking for underground water sources on the Eastern Arabian Peninsula have accidentally uncovered the outlines of a settlement that...

Vindolanda marks the 1900th anniversary of Hadrian’s Wall with an altar discovery

9 February 2022

9 February 2022

The excavation season hasn’t started yet, but the Vindolanda Roman fort has kicked off Hadrian’s Wall’s 1900th anniversary year with...

Hebrew University Archaeologists have Unveiled 7,000-year-old Seal İmpressions

10 June 2021

10 June 2021

Israeli archaeologists unveiled a 7,000-year-old clay seal impression used for commerce and protection of property, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem...

The Roman Imperial period, There was Less Waste in the Production of Marble Slabs than Today

17 May 2021

17 May 2021

When talking about the architecture of the ancient Roman Empire, most people usually think of the mental image of white...

Turkey to Present 12 Historic Artifacts to Istanbul Patriarch

10 August 2021

10 August 2021

The government said on Monday that Turkey will deliver stolen icons from ancient local churches to Istanbul’s Fener Greek Patriarch...

New Research Shows Angkor Wat’s Incredible Population Density

11 May 2021

11 May 2021

Angkor Wat was the grand capital of ancient Cambodia. The population of Angkor Wat, one of the most magnificent cities...

Ancient Arabic temple art depicts early camel hybrids

29 January 2022

29 January 2022

Evidence of early camel hybrids of dromedary and Bactrian camels has been uncovered by archaeologists who were working to restore...

Comments
Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.