7 October 2022 The Future is the Product of the Past

Archaeologists discover one of the largest Phallus Relief Carving of ancient Rome

According to an announcement by the region’s local history museum, a large Roman-era relief carving of a phallus has been unearthed by archaeologists excavating at Nueva Carteya in Córdoba, Spain on August 19.

Amulets and phallic representations were popular in ancient Rome because they were thought to be good luck symbols and heralds of favorable omens. They were associated with natural fecundity in Pagan religions, and the phallic symbols represented the fertility god Fascinus, warding off the “evil eye.” Although these phalluses were common in homes and military camps at the time, the size of the recently discovered phallus was not.

Over 18 inches (0.5 meters) long, the bas-relief phallus was discovered in El Higuerón, carved on a cornerstone of a large building that is currently being excavated. It could be the largest preserved Roman phallus carving, according to archaeologists.

Excavation of the site atop a wooded hillock in El Higuerón. Photo: AYUNTAMIENTO DE NUEVA CARTEYA
Excavation of the site atop a wooded hillock in El Higuerón. Photo: AYUNTAMIENTO DE NUEVA CARTEYA

El Higuerón is an Iberian settlement first occupied in the 4th century BC until the Roman conquest of the region around 206 BC.

However, despite the spectacular find, the building where the large penis was carved is the most significant part of the archaeological excavation. Professor Andrés María Adroher Auroux is leading a group of archaeologists from the University of Granada (Spain) that is part of a larger team of experts from the Historical Museum of Nueva Carteya and the Center for Archaeological Research of Southeastern Spain (Centro de Estudios de Arqueología Bastetana ). Their goal is to investigate and excavate this old Roman building that was placed over an even older Iberian settlement. Its strong, terraced walls once held up a tower-shaped structure whose purpose is still a mystery.

The first walled Iberian settlement from the fifth century BC was found during the initial excavations carried out in this region of gently rolling hills and olive groves in the middle of the 1960s. The pre-existing settlement was later destroyed by the Roman conquest, and the tower-shaped building, measuring 65 by 55 feet (20 by 17 meters), was built on its ruins.

Aerial view of the excavation site at El Higuerón. Photo: AYUNTAMIENTO DE NUEVA CARTEYA

The majority of the area’s unearthed structures are described in a 1970 paper on local fortified precincts by Javier Fortea and Juan Bernier, which makes an inference that these buildings may have been used by Hannibal, the Carthaginian general who led his army through southern Iberia at the end of the third century BC. The results of more recent research, however, clearly show that they have Roman roots.

The archaeologists describe the structure at El Higuerón as a “monumental Roman building” with perimeter walls six feet thick (1.8 meters) made of large limestone blocks.

Cover Photo: Ancient Roman phallus relief carving found in Nueva Carteya, Córdoba, Spain, 2022. MUSEO HISTÓRICO LOCAL DE NUEVA CARTEYA

Banner
Related Post

The human remains of 29 people buried as offerings in a pre-Inca temple were found at the Huaca Santa Rosa de Pucalá excavation site

23 October 2021

23 October 2021

The human remains of 29 people buried as sacrificial offerings have been discovered in a pre-Inca temple in northern Peru....

14,000 years old vessels made by Hunter-gatherers in Japan

1 May 2022

1 May 2022

The Late Pleistocene inhabitants of Tanegashima Island were making pottery about 14,000 years ago. In the Jomon period, people obtained...

One More Missing Links of Evolution Found

29 April 2021

29 April 2021

There is a phenomenon of missing links in the theory of evolution. Theorists of evolution continue to find these missing...

Unique work of Minoan art, the Pylos Combat Agate must be the David of the Prehistoric era

21 November 2021

21 November 2021

Found in a Greek tomb dating back 3,500 years, the artifact is so well designed that it looks as lively...

1000-Year-Old Tomb Found in Perre Ancient City in southeast Turkey

1 July 2021

1 July 2021

A 1,000-year-old tomb was unearthed in the ancient city of Perre in Adiyaman province. Perre is one of the five...

In the Black Sea, there is a “Ship Graveyard” with 2,500 years of wrecked ships

15 February 2022

15 February 2022

The Black Sea is the inland sea lying between Europe and Asia. Blacksea is located in Eurasia, surrounded by Europe,...

The remains of a very uncommon’ dinosaur species have been discovered in Brazil

20 November 2021

20 November 2021

Researchers have uncovered the remains of a toothless, two-legged dinosaur species that lived 70 million years ago in Brazil, calling...

A rare 2,500-year-old shipwreck found off the Greek island of Kythera

5 November 2021

5 November 2021

A rare shipwreck from the ancient era was discovered during the maritime survey for the Crete-Peloponnese subsea link. The Independent...

Archaeologists discovered 130 dwellings around the Ringheiligtum Pömmelte monument “German Stonehenge”

15 June 2021

15 June 2021

Archaeologists have unearthed 130 dwellings at an Early Bronze Age monument in Germany, indicating that the ‘Stonehenge’ was once home...

Archaeologists uncover a 1,500-year-old Lost Mayan city in the Yucatan

28 May 2022

28 May 2022

Researchers have presented their findings after discovering the remnants of an ancient Mayan city on a building site in Mexico....

The newly discovered fossils are 200,000 years old in Denisova Cave

29 November 2021

29 November 2021

Scientists have discovered the earliest remains of a human lineage known as the Denisovans. Researchers have identified stone artifacts connected...

The first Dutch Neanderthal’s ‘Krijn’ face was reconstructed

7 September 2021

7 September 2021

World-renowned “paleo-artists” Kennis brothers have reconstructed the face of the first Neanderthal in the Netherlands. After more than 50,000 years,...

“Urartian Royal garbage dump” was found during excavations at Ayanis Castle

3 September 2022

3 September 2022

During the excavations carried out in the Ayanis Castle, which was built by the Urartian King Rusa II on the...

New evidence for the use of lions during executions in Roman Britain

9 August 2021

9 August 2021

Archaeologists have discovered an elaborate key as proof that wild animals were employed as execution vehicles in public arena events...

Evidence found of Goose domestication in Neolithic China 7,000 years ago

8 March 2022

8 March 2022

Geese may have been domesticated in what is now China as early as 7,000 years ago, according to a study...

Comments
Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.