17 July 2024 The Future is the Product of the Past

Ancient city “Germanicia” lost in 73 years

The presence of the ancient city of Germanicia, discovered during an illegal excavation in the southeast Turkish province of Kahramanmaraş in 2007, revealed 73 years ago, but the ruins of the old city were destroyed by illegal construction.

While the ruins of Kaisereia Germanikeia, which was called the imperial city in the Roman period, can be seen in Kahramanmaraş with aerial photographs taken about 73 years ago, it has been seen that it has been under the buildings due to unplanned construction in the last 50 years.

Mosaics, which covered the floors throughout the late Roman era, reflected the era’s social life. The mosaics made their way into archaeological literature through the World Mosaic Unions’ multi-language publishing, increasing the region’s prominence.

According to Yunus Emre Kaçamaz, head of the Kahramanmaraş Chamber of Architects, 17 structures survived, and one mound from the old city was plainly visible in an aerial image of the region taken in 1948.

Yunus Emre Kaçamaz, head of the Kahramanmaraş Chamber of Architects.
Yunus Emre Kaçamaz, head of the Kahramanmaraş Chamber of Architects.

“If we were more careful in 1948, we might have been visiting this place as an open-air museum right now,” he said.

Kaçamaz recently made some examinations in the ancient city, which was found in the first century, but only its remains from the fourth and sixth centuries have been unearthed so far in the excavations.

Kaçamaz, who also visited the Germanicia Mosaics, which were available to tourists in two distinct locations, came upon 1,500-year-old moss-covered columns in one of the region’s residences. The ancient columns were discovered during the foundation excavation of his uncle’s house, according to owner Ali Akbey, and some of the columns were utilized as stones in the construction of the garden wall.

Ancient city of Germanicia
Ancient city of Germanicia-Hunter.

Stating that the ancient city of Germenicia is significant in terms of tourism, Kaçamaz said that the authorities should start a new and different work in the region as soon as possible.

“When we look at the aerial photographs taken in 1948, we can see the ruins of the ancient city of Germanicia in the photographs. If we had acted more carefully in 1948, we might have been visiting this place as an open-air museum with column heads and churches. And now there has been an unbelievably illegal construction. The Culture and Tourism Ministry and the Environment and Urbanization Ministry should support this place, and we should turn the region into an open-air museum as soon as possible with expropriations. There are too many illegal structures here. This needs to be resolved as soon as possible,” Kaçamaz said.

The ancient city was found in 2007 during illicit excavations in the Dulkadiroğlu district. The registration, expropriation, excavation, and preservation operations to unearth the old city that encompasses 140 hectares, including the neighborhoods of Namik Kemal, Şeyhadil, Dulkadirolu, and Bağlarbaş, are currently underway.

In 2014-2015, a pedestrian platform with a temporary protective wall and canopy was erected around the mosaic area. After the mosaics were restored and conserved, the area was made available to the public for free.

Related Articles

Archaeologists uncovered over 100,000 ancient coins, some more than 2,000 years old

4 November 2023

4 November 2023 9

In an excavation at the Sosha Village East 03 archaeological site in Maebashi City, Japan, archaeologists stumbled upon a remarkable...

The museum’s “Oscar” Awards had Received this Year by the Troy Museum and the Odunpazarı Modern Museum

11 May 2021

11 May 2021

At the European Museum of the Year Awards (EMYA) online ceremony on May 6, Turkey’s renowned Troy Museum and Odunpazar...

The discovery that surprised archaeologists; a Rare glass cup adorning the table of rich Romans in Crimea

2 April 2022

2 April 2022

A discovery made in Frontovoye-3 necropolis in Crimea shows that during the Roman Empire there were more centers of glass...

A newly Discovered Church in Sudan could be a Cathedral

2 June 2021

2 June 2021

Archaeologists have found the remains of the largest church known from medieval Nubia in old Dongola (Sudan). Dongola was the...

An unknown human group is revealed in a 7,200-year-old skeleton discovered in Indonesia

27 August 2021

27 August 2021

According to a study released this week, archaeologists uncovered the bones of a 7,200-year-old skeleton from a female hunter-gatherer in...

The three-headed statue of Goddess Hecate discovered in Turkey’s Mersin

18 August 2023

18 August 2023

In the ancient city of Kelenderis in Mersin, located in the south of Turkey, the statue of the 3-headed goddess...

Yale Archaeologist discovered an “arcade” of rock-cut ancient mancala game boards in Kenya

2 February 2024

2 February 2024

Veronica Waweru, a Yale University archaeologist conducting fieldwork in Kenya, discovered an “arcade” of ancient Mancala game boards carved into...

New study reveals Dog ancestry can be traced back to two separate wolf populations

30 June 2022

30 June 2022

An international group of geneticists and archaeologists with participation of the University of Potsdam have found that the ancestry of...

Exciting Discovery of oldest English coin in Canada

16 November 2022

16 November 2022

A gold coin found on the south coast of Newfoundland, Canada’s easternmost province, may be the oldest known English coin...

Archaeologists found a noble woman buried beside her ‘husband’ 1,000 years ago with the top of her face hollowed out

4 November 2023

4 November 2023

Archaeologists unearthed the 1,000-year-old remains of a woman with her face and head hollowed out buried next to her husband...

Red lipstick dating back 3,600 years was discovered in Iran -the oldest ever found-

14 February 2024

14 February 2024

Archaeologists have discovered a small chlorite vial containing a deep red cosmetic preparation believed to be an ancient type of...

The World’s Earliest Ground Stone Needles Found in Western Tibetan Plateau

26 June 2024

26 June 2024

In western Tibet, six peculiar stone artifacts were discovered in 2020 by archaeologists excavating close to the shore of Lake...

Found Home of the Legendary Viking Woman Who Crossed the Atlantic 500 Years Before Columbus

11 March 2021

11 March 2021

Archaeologists in Iceland recently excavated a farm believed to belong to the legendary Viking woman Gudrid Torbjörnsdottir. She is believed...

Ancient Chinese porcelain worth 1 million euros was stolen from the German museum, sparking anger

15 September 2023

15 September 2023

Nine pieces of historic Chinese porcelain worth around €1 million were stolen from the Museum for East Asian Art (Cologne)...

Archeologists Unearth Spectator snacks from the Roman Period in Colosseum

28 November 2022

28 November 2022

An excavation of the Colosseum’s sewer systems has uncovered a selection of spectator snacks from the Roman Period. It appears...