23 July 2024 The Future is the Product of the Past

A Gold Belt Weighing 432 Grams Unearthed During Excavations in Ani Ruins is on Display

The gold belt discovered 22 years ago during excavations in the ancient city of Ani, often referred to as the “City of 1001 Churches” and “City of Forty Gates”, is on display at the Kars Archaeological and Ethnographic Museum.

Located in Kars, Türkiye, and listed as a UNESCO World Heritage site, Ani is undergoing extensive archaeological excavations. It reveals its buried history through meticulous work at eight different excavation sites.

During the Middle Ages, Ani was a highly significant city that prospered, especially in the tenth and thirteenth centuries. The city, renowned for its architectural wonders, was an important hub for trade, culture, and religion. The city’s distinct legacy was shaped by the blending of multiple civilizations, such as the Seljuks, Georgians, Armenians, and Byzantines.

Photo: AA

The golden belt, which was found in 2002 during the excavations carried out under the direction of Hacettepe University Faculty Member Prof. Dr. Beyhan Karamağaralı between 1989 and 2005, was kept under protection for 22 years.

The belt with various figures on it weighs 432 grams.

Hakim Aslan, Acting Director of the Kars Archaeological and Ethnographic Museum, told Anadolu Agency: “We know that Ani lived its glorious period in the Middle Ages, and archaeological excavations were started by Russian-born Nikolay Marr in Ani Ruins in the late 1800s. Later, the excavations were carried out by Turkish professors and are still continuing. The gold belt is one of the artifacts unearthed as a result of the excavations carried out in 2002 under Prof. Dr. Beyhan Karamağaralı. The artifact is very important, it is made of gold material.”

Photo: AA

The belt is made up of three components: the belt plate, the belt buckle, and the belt loops on the second textile piece. The belt has decorations and is entirely composed of gold material. The belt buckle in the middle is made with 8 slices and savat craftsmanship is seen on the edges. Savat is a very old gold and silver decoration technique that originates in Dagestan. The belt plate measures 25 centimeters in length and 2.5 centimeters in width. There is a human head figure at the end.

Pointing out that the same figures are seen in the wall paintings of the Uighur period, Hakim Aslan said, “In fact, a third eye is seen here, and the word ‘lisa’ is written on the belt buckle as well as the human figure. The word ‘lisa’ means the owner. On the ceramics we have seen before, the word lisa was used in the sense of bringing good luck and prosperity to the owner.”

Photo: AA

The golden belt will be on display at the Kars Archaeology and Ethnography Museum for only 3 months.

Cover Photo: AA

Related Articles

Mine-clearance divers discovered an ancient shipwreck dating from the 3rd century BC

25 June 2023

25 June 2023

As a result of collaborative training exercises between Croatian and Italian naval mine-clearance divers, one of the earliest fully preserved...

Aizanoi Ancient City is Being Restored

15 March 2021

15 March 2021

In the 5000-year-old ancient city, the focus is on restoration, starting with the theater and the stadium. Aizanoi Ancient City...

The 3,000-Year-Old Ancient City is Under Danger

8 February 2021

8 February 2021

For the port planned to be built in Izmir’s Aliağa district, a part of the 3,000-year-old ancient city is in...

A center on the Anatolian Mesopotamian trade route; Tavsanli Mound

24 October 2021

24 October 2021

Excavations at Tavşanlı mound, which is known to be the first settlement in Western Anatolia during the Bronze Age, continue....

2,000-year-old stone faces and engravings emerge amid severe drought in Amazon

24 October 2023

24 October 2023

As a result of record-low water levels brought on by the region’s worst drought in over a century, faces carved...

Remains of a 5-year-old girl found under Real Alcázar in Spain

9 May 2021

9 May 2021

The body of a five-year-old fair-haired girl who lived in the late Middle Ages and was most likely of noble...

2100-year-old women skeleton found lying in bronze ‘Mermaid Bed’

4 June 2022

4 June 2022

Archaeologists have discovered the 2100-year-old skeleton of a woman lying in a bronze ‘Mermaid Bed’ near the city of Kozani...

Archaeologists found a 2,000-year-old Roman road in Cluj-Napoca in northwest Romania

23 January 2023

23 January 2023

Archaeologists from the National Museum of the History of Transylvania have discovered a well-preserved 2,000-year-old Roman road in the city...

The Oklahoma City Museum of Art will launch “The Painters of Pompeii” on June 26

23 June 2021

23 June 2021

A number of collection highlights will travel to North America for the first time as part of the exhibition The...

A burial complex dating to the Second Intermediate Period has been discovered at the Dra Abu el-Naga necropolis at Luxor

12 April 2023

12 April 2023

At the Dra Abu el-Naga necropolis in Luxor, a family burial complex from the Second Intermediate Period has been found....

Rare 400-year-old Bronze Trumpets Discovered on a shipwreck in Croatia

12 July 2024

12 July 2024

Croatian underwater archaeologists have made an extraordinary discovery off the southern coast of Istria near Cape Kamenjak. They have unearthed...

Archaeologists discovered medieval Bury St Edmunds Abbey ‘Bishop Boy’ token in Norfolk

19 December 2023

19 December 2023

Archaeologists have discovered token in Norfolk in the East of England, dating from between 1470 and 1560, given to the...

Archaeological Finding Traces Chinese Tea Culture Back To 400 BC

7 February 2022

7 February 2022

An archaeological team from Shandong University, east China’s Shandong Province, has found the earliest known tea remains in the world...

The World’s Largest Pyramid Is Hidden Within a Hill in Mexico

8 October 2022

8 October 2022

The largest and tallest pyramids in the world are incredible feats of design, engineering, and construction. The Great Pyramid of...

A 2000-year-old bronze military diploma was discovered in Turkey’s Perre ancient city

2 January 2022

2 January 2022

During excavations in the ancient city of Perre, located in the southeastern Turkish province of Adiyaman, archaeologists uncovered a bronze...