30 July 2021 The Future is the Product of the Past

Gladiators’ ancient hygiene tools on exhibit in Izmir

Turkey’s Izmir Archaeological Museum is hosting a different exhibition this month.

A bronze strigil is the museum’s guest this month as part of its You Will See What You Can’t See project, in which a new, special artifact is introduced to visitors every month.

The Izmir Archaeology Museum recently opened a new, unique exhibition focusing on the historical relic known as a “strigil,” which was used to cleanse the body 2,300 years ago by scraping off dirt, perspiration, and oil.

The strigil in issue was unearthed during archaeological digs at Teos, one of the 12 ancient Greek towns that made up the historical Ionian League.

The tool was used in ancient Roman and Greek cultures, and the one on display is believed to have belonged to an athlete or a gladiator.

The Izmir Archaeology Museum
The tool was used in ancient Roman and Greek cultures, and the one on display is believed to have belonged to an athlete or a gladiator. Photo: AA

Hünkar Keser, director of the museum, said that the word “strigil” could be translated as “cleaning spoon,” as he explained the historical use of the artifact.

“We know that athletes covered their bodies with olive oil before they practiced sports. After completing their workouts in sandy areas, they had to clean their bodies,” Keser told Anadolu Agency (AA). “They used to scrape their bodies with this spoon-like strigil, and thus (remove) the coarse dirt.”

At approximately 16 centimeters (nearly 6.3 inches) long, and shaped in a form that evokes the image of a crescent moon, the strigil has unique engravings on its surface that depict scenes from a cockfight.

The strigil was discovered during archaeological excavations in the ancient Greek city of Teos, one of the 12 cities that formed the historical Ionian League.
The strigil was discovered during archaeological excavations in the ancient Greek city of Teos, one of the 12 cities that formed the historical Ionian League. Photo: AA

“We know that it is a custom-made spoon. The cockfighting figure on it is also an interesting detail. In those times, fighting is a form of entertainment used to attract people’s attention. The use of the strigil is also specific to that period.”

Keser noted that the strigil was unique, just like the other ancient artifacts of the museum. He added that the rare and special strigil had attracted a lot of attention from visitors.

Keser said that some visitors would examine the artifacts that were exhibited as part of the “You Will See What You Can’t See” project for hours.

The “You Will See What You Can’t See” exhibition is due to run through January 2022.

Banner
Related Post

New Dead Sea Scrolls in The Horror Cave

16 March 2021

16 March 2021

On Tuesday, Israeli archaeologists revealed dozens of recently discovered fragments of Bible text, the Dead Sea Scrolls, which were based...

Japan-Persia Ancient Ties

20 June 2021

20 June 2021

Japanese and Persian ancient ties go back to the 7th century. Silk Road connected Japan with countries and regions far...

Egypt Traces Relics of Ramses III to the Arabian Peninsula

7 June 2021

7 June 2021

Following various findings showing ancient Egyptian King Ramses III had a presence on the Arabian Peninsula, an Egyptian archaeological team...

Medieval Ring with a Skull Emblem Found in Wales and The Gold Coins are Declared Treasure

11 April 2021

11 April 2021

Located in wales nine treasure finds dating from the medieval and post-medieval periods have been declared treasure. Metal detectors in...

Artificial Intelligence Project That Will Revolutionize Archaeology

5 April 2021

5 April 2021

Polish Scientists to opening a new era in archeology They plan to use artificial intelligence to detect prehistoric cemeteries, castles,...

8,000-year-old Musical Instrument found in northwest Turkey

4 July 2021

4 July 2021

Archaeologists in northwestern Turkey’s Bilecik on Tuesday discovered a musical instrument that dates back to an estimated 8,000 years. During...

Found Home of the Legendary Viking Woman Who Crossed the Atlantic 500 Years Before Columbus

11 March 2021

11 March 2021

Archaeologists in Iceland recently excavated a farm believed to belong to the legendary Viking woman Gudrid Torbjörnsdottir. She is believed...

Are Istanbul’s First Hosts Really Megarians?

14 February 2021

14 February 2021

When it comes to the first establishment of Istanbul, the first to come to mind are the stories of Megarians...

Two rock chambers thought to be dining rooms unearthed at ‘House of Muses’ in southeastern Turkey

27 July 2021

27 July 2021

House of Muses, a Roman-era house named after the muse mosaics found in the area located in the ancient city...

‘Miniature Pompeii’ found beneath Astra cinema in Verona

15 June 2021

15 June 2021

Archaeologists have uncovered a “miniature Pompeii” in the shape of a well-preserved ancient edifice near Verona, Italy. An old Roman...

Lost medieval road thought to have been used by famous Scottish king Robert the Bruce found

27 June 2021

27 June 2021

Excavating a hill considered to have played a critical part in the Battle of Bannockburn, archaeologists discovered a forgotten medieval...

One More Missing Links of Evolution Found

29 April 2021

29 April 2021

There is a phenomenon of missing links in the theory of evolution. Theorists of evolution continue to find these missing...

Two Archaic Sculptures was Unearthed in Milas Euromos 2021 Excavations

2 July 2021

2 July 2021

Milas Euromos 2021 archaeological excavations continue. During the excavations of Milas Euromos 2021, archaeologists unearthed two archaic period statues (kuros)...

Little Known Powerful Kingdom of History’s “Mitanni Kingdom”

3 February 2021

3 February 2021

Hurrians; They became a state organization with a warrior and ruling class of Indo-Aryan origin who came from North-West Mesopotamia...

Ancient Dog Figurines Mini Tea Utensils on Display in Nara

21 February 2021

21 February 2021

Nara was the capital of Japan from 710 to 794, also known as the Nara period, before moving to the...

Comments
Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *