2 December 2022 The Future is the Product of the Past

‘Exceptional’ Viking Age silver treasure found in Norway

A treasure trove of silver fragments from the Viking Age has been discovered in Stjørdal, near Trondheim in central Norway.

The treasure is comprised of 46 silver objects. Only two of them are complete finger rings, with the rest consisting of broken coins, bracelets, a braided necklace, chains, and wire. They were collected and cut or broken to use for the silver weight.

The majority of hack silver hoards discovered in Scandinavia contain a fragment of each larger object. This hoard is unusual in that it contains several fragments of the same object.

Unlike some Viking discoveries that are made in connection with construction work, this find was made purely by chance.

Pawel Bednarski, a metal detectorist, discovered the hoard last December. He first discovered two small silver rings, and then more and more pieces began to emerge. Bednarski eventually extracted 46 objects from the ground, all of which were barely buried between an inch and three inches beneath the surface. After rinsing the clay off one of the pieces, he realized he had discovered something of archaeological significance and informed municipal authorities.

Two silver finger rings from the find. Photo: Birgit Maixner / NTNU Science Museum.
Two silver finger rings from the find. Photo: Birgit Maixner / NTNU Science Museum.

“This is a rather exceptional find,” said NTNU Science Museum researcher and archaeologist Birgit Maixner. “It has been many years since such a large treasure find from the Viking Age has been made in Norway.”

According to Maixner, the fact that most of the pieces were broken into fragments can be explained by what we know about the Vikings’ economy.

“This find is from a time when silver pieces that were weighed were used as a means of payment. This system is called the weight economy, and was in use in the transition between the barter economy and the coin economy,” she said.

In continental Europe, the coin economy persisted even after the collapse of the Western Roman Empire, but in Norway, no coins were minted until the late 9th century. It was a barter economy until the end of the 8th century when the weight economy began to take hold. It was far more agile than barter because, rather than having to manage a large quantity of goods to be traded, small pieces of silver could be easily packed and carried. Additionally, valuation is much simpler and only needs a scale.

Arabic coins were among the Stjørdal Viking silver find. Photo: Birgit Maixner / NTNU Science Museum.

Arab coins in the collection

The largest source of silver during the Viking Age came from Arabic coins, which were discovered in Stjrdal. One of the main reasons they came to Scandinavia was for the fur trade.

Only four of the seven coins found have had their dates determined, but they all belong to the eighth century. That is a lot older than the majority of other Arab coins found in Norway.

“The relatively old age of the Islamic coins, style of bracelets, and the large degree of fragmentation of most of the objects is more typical of treasure finds from Denmark than from Norway. These features also make it likely to assume that the treasure is from around 900 AD,” explained Maixner.

Silver and Viking Age coins discovered on the plain indicate that trading took place in this area. A Viking Age grave had previously been discovered at the nearby farm Moksnes. Among other things, this contained a bowl scale used to weigh silver.

Cover Photo: The find consists of a total of 46 objects in silver. Photo: Birgit Maixner, NTNU Science Museum.

Banner
Related Post

Scientists Use Artificial İntelligence to Study Ancient Australian Rock Art

1 April 2021

1 April 2021

Rock art is the oldest surviving human art form. Throughout Australia, petroglyphs are part of the life and customs of...

Colossae Ancient City Excavation Works Begin

8 September 2021

8 September 2021

Excavations of the ancient city of Colossae, located in the Honaz district of Denizli province in western Turkey, are starting...

2,000-year-old Celtic hoard of gold ‘rainbow cups’ discovered in northeastern Germany

13 January 2022

13 January 2022

Archaeologists have found an ancient Celtic coins treasure consisting of 41 gold coins in a field in Brandenburg, a state...

A new study in Portugal suggests that mummification in Europe may be older than previously thought

3 March 2022

3 March 2022

New research on the hunter-gatherer burial sites in the Sado Valley in Portugal, dating to 8,000 years ago, suggests that...

3D virtual reconstruction of the Celtic city gate

2 May 2022

2 May 2022

A new 3D virtual reconstruction of the Celtic gate has been made in Staffelberg, in the German state of Bavaria....

“Urartian Royal garbage dump” was found during excavations at Ayanis Castle

3 September 2022

3 September 2022

During the excavations carried out in the Ayanis Castle, which was built by the Urartian King Rusa II on the...

Archaeologists have unearthed an incredible hoard of over 300 Iron Age ‘potins’ in West London

17 July 2021

17 July 2021

Archaeologists at an HS2 construction site in Hillingdon, West London discovered an astonishing treasure of over 300 Iron Age ‘potins”....

Millennia-Old İron Production Facilities Found in Iran

2 May 2021

2 May 2021

Archaeologists have uncovered many millennia-old iron manufacturing sites in a historical village in southcentral Iran. A local tourism official declared...

The museum’s “Oscar” Awards had Received this Year by the Troy Museum and the Odunpazarı Modern Museum

11 May 2021

11 May 2021

At the European Museum of the Year Awards (EMYA) online ceremony on May 6, Turkey’s renowned Troy Museum and Odunpazar...

The World’s Oldest Smiling Water Flask with Emoji will be on display

4 July 2021

4 July 2021

After the collapse of the Hittite Empire, the Late Hittite States was established in Anatolia and Syria. One of these...

An inscription containing the Turk name was discovered for the first time in Anatolia

3 September 2022

3 September 2022

For the first time in the pre-Islamic Early period Turkish history, an inscription bearing the inscription expression “Turk” and written...

Columns in Lagina Hecate Sanctuary Rise Again

19 February 2021

19 February 2021

Lagina Hecate Sanctuary is located in Yatağan district of Muğla. It is an important sacred area belonging to the Carians...

Medieval Islamic glass of Scottish Caerlaverock Castle reveals untold histories

23 October 2022

23 October 2022

Discovered by archaeologists at Caerlaverock Castle, eleven kilometers south of Dumfries on Scotland’s south coast, a trio of Islamic glass...

“Operation Heritage” uncovers an artifact smuggling ring in Turkey

1 June 2022

1 June 2022

Turkish security forces searched locations in 38 regions on Tuesday in one of the largest operations against artifact smugglers, with...

A 4,500-year-old rope remains were discovered at Turkey’s Seyitömer mound

26 December 2021

26 December 2021

In the rescue excavation carried out in the mound, which is located within the license border of Çelikler Seyitömer Electricity...

Comments
Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *