19 June 2024 The Future is the Product of the Past

Czech experimental archaeologists successfully completed their 1-month voyage in the Aegean Sea using a replica of a prehistoric vessel

Radomír Tichý, an archeology professor at the University of Hradec Králové who is also the director of the Všestary Archeopark, and his team of experimental archaeologists using a replica prehistoric vessel, successfully completed its voyage across the Aegean Sea.

Hradec archeologists organized several maritime expeditions in wooden boats, starting in 1995. The third expedition, completed this summer, is called Monoxylon IV.

Their name comes from the Greek word “monoxylon,” (short version monoxyl), which means a simple vessel chiseled out from a single tree trunk. Monoxyles have been shown to be one of the oldest documented types of boats. Their use has been confirmed by archaeological findings since the Stone Age, and some natural ethnic groups still use them today.

The Monoxylon expeditions are maritime expeditions of Radomír Tichý and his team, which closely combine science in the form of experimental archaeology and the adventure of maritime navigation

Expedition organizer Radomír Tichý said the team aimed to shed light on the nature of agricultural colonization in the Mediterranean 9,000 years ago.

The team of 20 paddlers and a helmsman braved the open waters to complete a 500-kilometer route divided into 17 sections. Starting from the Greek island of Samos, located off the coast of Turkey, they navigated through various islands before reaching the Peloponnese peninsula in Greece. The crew made overnight stays on some of the islands.

Photo: Monoxylon.cz

The boat, an accurate replica of an 8,000-year-old Neolithic boat discovered in Lake Bracciano near Rome in 1994, weighs nearly three tons, is 11.5 meters in length, and is up to 1.2 meters in width.

The vessel was made last year from a single trunk of an uprooted oak tree that grew for about 300 years in a local forest in East Bohemia and is larger than the wooden boats used in earlier expeditions.

The expedition presented numerous challenges to its participants, including dealing with extreme heat. The most difficult leg of the journey was an 11-hour upwind crossing to the island of Amorgos, battling sweltering temperatures and scarce winds between Melos and the Peloponnese.

Over 100 hours of paddling, the team conquered the entire 500-kilometer route at an average speed of 5 kilometers per hour, showcasing their determination and endurance.

According to its organizers, the aim of the expeditions “is a practical verification of the abilities of simple wooden vessels – monoxyls, in the spreading of early agricultural populations through the Mediterranean.”

Related Articles

200,000-year-old ‘mammoth graveyard’ found in the southwest UK

19 December 2021

19 December 2021

Researchers have unearthed a mammoth “graveyard” filled with the bony remains of five individuals, including an infant, two juveniles, and...

Angkor Wat Reopens

26 April 2021

26 April 2021

After being temporarily closed on April 7 to prevent the spread of Covid-19 to locals, Apsara National Authority and Angkor...

Rare Astrolabe Discovered in Verona Sheds Light On Islamic, Jewish, and Christian Scientific Exchange

6 March 2024

6 March 2024

An eleventh-century rare astrolabe bearing Arabic and Hebrew inscriptions was recently discovered in a museum in Verona, Italy. It dates...

Evidence of Necromancy during Roman era in the Te’omim Cave, Jerusalem Hills: Oil Lamps, Spearheads, and Skulls

14 July 2023

14 July 2023

Te’omim Cave in the Jerusalem Hills may once have served as a local oracle where people communed with the dead...

Khirbet Midras pyramid and  Archaeological Site in Israel

28 November 2022

28 November 2022

Khirbet Midras (Arabic) or Horvat Midras (Hebrew) is one of several antiquities sites located within the Adullam Grove National Park,...

Turkish researchers use Artificial Intelligence to read cuneatic Hittite tablets

9 January 2023

9 January 2023

Thanks to a project implemented in Türkiye, 1,954 ancient Hittite tablets are being read for the first time using artificial...

Red lipstick dating back 3,600 years was discovered in Iran -the oldest ever found-

14 February 2024

14 February 2024

Archaeologists have discovered a small chlorite vial containing a deep red cosmetic preparation believed to be an ancient type of...

The 11-meter giant statue of the island of Naxos “Dionysus of Apollonas”

22 March 2023

22 March 2023

One of the two ancient marble quarries, thought to have begun the sculpture, the greatest art of antiquity, is located...

Found Home of the Legendary Viking Woman Who Crossed the Atlantic 500 Years Before Columbus

11 March 2021

11 March 2021

Archaeologists in Iceland recently excavated a farm believed to belong to the legendary Viking woman Gudrid Torbjörnsdottir. She is believed...

Centuries-old boardwalk discovered

22 December 2023

22 December 2023

During construction work in November 2023, road construction workers in Fürth came across an archaeological sensation: a centuries-old boardwalk under...

Gladiators’ ancient hygiene tools on exhibit in Izmir

22 July 2021

22 July 2021

Turkey’s Izmir Archaeological Museum is hosting a different exhibition this month. A bronze strigil is the museum’s guest this month...

A previously unknown subterranean tract of an Augustan-era aqueduct has been rediscovered in Naples

4 February 2023

4 February 2023

A previously unknown subterranean tract nearly half a mile long of an Augustan-era aqueduct has been rediscovered in Naples, southern...

Vindolanda marks the 1900th anniversary of Hadrian’s Wall with an altar discovery

9 February 2022

9 February 2022

The excavation season hasn’t started yet, but the Vindolanda Roman fort has kicked off Hadrian’s Wall’s 1900th anniversary year with...

Evidence of the Birth of Archaic Monotheism in Anatolia found at Oluz Höyük, “Havangah prayer at Oluz Höyük”

27 March 2022

27 March 2022

Oluz Höyük, located 25 kilometres west of Amasya, is an ancient city which has rich findings of religious structuring. During...

Grave Goods Show Gendered Roles for Neolithic Age

16 April 2021

16 April 2021

Grave goods, such as stone tools, have revealed that Neolithic farmers had different work-related activities for men and women. Researchers...