14 June 2024 The Future is the Product of the Past

Stone reliefs describing the Persian-Greek wars were found in the ancient city of Daskyleion in northwestern Turkey

A relief depicting a fifth-century BC battle between the Greeks and Persians was discovered in the ancient city of Dascylium in the Bandırma district of Balikesir, northwest Turkey.

Archeological excavations at the ancient city of Daskyleion, which has evidence of numerous Anatolian civilizations, continue under the direction of Professor Kaan İren, Faculty Member of Muğla Sıtkı Koçman University’s Archeology Department.

According to archeologist Kaan Iren, who heads the excavation site of the ancient city of Dascylium, the figures on the relief show fighting Greek soldiers beneath the hoofs of Persian warhorses.

“Here is a scene of propaganda under the pretext of war. We can say these reliefs are a scene from the Persian-Greek wars,” Iren told Anadolu Agency.

He added: “We think these reliefs were probably made for propaganda purposes during the wars.”

Professor Kaan İren told: "Here is a scene of propaganda under the pretext of war. We can say these reliefs are a scene from the Persian-Greek wars,"
Professor Kaan İren told: “Here is a scene of propaganda under the pretext of war. We can say these reliefs are a scene from the Persian-Greek wars,”

Professor Iren said that the first settlers of the ancient city were the Phrygians. Stating that the reliefs carved into the stone were cleaned by the restorers in the excavation house, İren said:

“The relief, dating from the Persian era, from the 5th century BC, depicts the war between the Persians and the Greeks. This was one of the most important achievements of the season for us. In the figures on it, there are Greek soldiers fighting and Persians on horseback fighting them. Greek soldiers are depicted under the feet of Persian horses,” he said.

The excavation team discovered the relief while trying to unearth the 8th century BC wall from the Phrygian period. The five-meter-wide wall is believed to have been built by the ancient Phrygian civilization to protect its territory.

Profesör Kaan İren, “Of the eighth-century-B.C. wall left from the Phrygian age, this year we unearthed an area of four meters (13.1 feet) high and 40 meters long. We think this wall, which is made of stone and mudbrick with the mudbrick parts having disappeared over time, was seven or eight meters high,” said.

Iren stated that the discovery of the relief during the excavations of the wall surprised the team and became one of the season’s most significant discoveries.

Balıkesir Governorship, Balıkesir Metropolitan Municipality, Bandırma, and Manyas municipalities, Muğla Sıtkı Koçman University, Bandırma Çelebi Port Management, and Hydrogen Peroxide, Banvit, Mauri Maya, Torunlar Gıda companies also support the excavation.

Related Articles

İnteresting Relief on the Roman Millstone

20 February 2021

20 February 2021

During the Cambridgeshire A14 road improvement work, workers found an interesting millstone. A large penis was engraved in the Roman-era...

1,500-year-old Byzantine artifacts found under a peach orchard in Turkey’s Iznik

27 January 2023

27 January 2023

In the world-famous historical city of Iznik, which was the capital of four civilizations, a farmer found coins and historical...

Rare bronze hand discovered in Roman Vindolanda, England

11 July 2023

11 July 2023

One of Europe’s most important Roman archeological sites is the Fort of Vindolanda, one of the earliest Roman garrisons built...

14th-century inscription found on Turkey’s Giresun Island

4 January 2022

4 January 2022

On Giresun Island, which is 1.2 kilometers (0.7 miles) off the Turkish province of Giresun on the Black Sea’s southeastern...

Rare discovery: Ancient Egyptian burial reveals Ovarian Teeth in Oldest Example of Teratoma

13 November 2023

13 November 2023

Archaeologists have unearthed the oldest documented example of a teratoma discovered within the 3,000-year-old burial chamber of a young woman...

Czech archaeologists discovered a unique bronze belt buckle dating back to the eighth century

12 December 2023

12 December 2023

Czech archaeologists have unearthed a bronze belt buckle from the early Middle Ages, depicting a snake devouring a frog-like creature....

Around 400-year-old Bronze idols found during house construction in India

25 April 2024

25 April 2024

Three bronze idols, estimated to be about 400 years old, were unearthed during excavation for a house construction project in...

Archaeologists discover medieval a tableman gaming piece in Bedfordshire, England

26 April 2023

26 April 2023

Archaeologists in Bedfordshire, England, have made an intriguing discovery: a tableman gaming piece was discovered at a medieval site. Cotswold...

Female pharaoh’s temple reveals teamwork of Egypt’s ‘ancient masters’

18 November 2021

18 November 2021

Despite the widely acknowledged monumentality and durability of ancient Egyptian sculpture, carved reliefs, and paintings the makers of these works...

2600-year-old Med period artifacts found in Oluz Höyük, in Turkey

17 October 2022

17 October 2022

During the Oluz Höyük excavations in Amasya, artifacts dating back to the Med Kingdom period were found, dating back to...

2000-year-old passage found after Latrina at Smyrna Theater

28 January 2022

28 January 2022

Archaeologists discovered a 2,000-year-old passage that was 26 meters long and constructed in an “L” form in the theater part...

A 3,400-year-old Pyramid from the Scythian-Saka period found in Karaganda region of Kazakhstan

2 November 2023

2 November 2023

A pyramid belonging to the Scythian-Saka period was found in the Karaganda region of Kazakhstan. Experts announced that the Karajartas...

New evidence suggests Indonesia’s Gunung Padang could be world’s oldest known pyramid

21 November 2023

21 November 2023

Gunung Padang, a  colossal megalithic structure nestled in the lush landscapes of West Java, Indonesia, could be the world’s oldest...

‘Miniature Pompeii’ found beneath Astra cinema in Verona

15 June 2021

15 June 2021

Archaeologists have uncovered a “miniature Pompeii” in the shape of a well-preserved ancient edifice near Verona, Italy. An old Roman...

This Month in the “You Will See What You Don’t See” Project

11 February 2021

11 February 2021

Izmir Archeology Museum started to exhibit the unseen artifacts in its warehouses last month in the project that started under...