25 September 2022 The Future is the Product of the Past

Salvage Excavations Started in Giresun Island on Turkey’s Black Sea Coast

Rescue excavations are starting again on Giresun Island, where the first examples of human settlement in the Black Sea Region in northern Turkey are seen.

Giresun Island Rescue Excavations will be carried out by a group of archaeologists and art historians in September, October, according to a written statement by the Governorship of Giresun.

Giresun Island, a Subject of Many Legends and Myths

Giresun Island, which has traces of human life since the 2nd millennium BC, has been the subject of many legends and myths. The legend of “Hercules and the golden fur” is one of the most well-known narratives. In the written statement that there is a legend that Amazon women organized expeditions to the island and established a living space here, the following information was given about the cultural assets that Giresun Island hosts.

“Numerous remains and traces of life belonging to the Hellenistic, Roman, and Byzantine periods have been found. The wall ruins surrounding the island and the ruins of the temple dated to the 2nd century AD, the church, chapel, water well, and many tomb structures known to have been built in the 12th century after AD, reveal the cultural richness of the island.”

The Hamza stone
The Hamza Stone found on Giresun Island exhibits the presence of the Goddess Cybele.

The Hamza Stone, seen as the center of a mystical belief with a history of 4 thousand years, is the most important structure of Giresun Island. The island was declared as a Second Degree Natural and Archaeological Site by the Trabzon Cultural Heritage Regional Board Directorate on 17.05.1991.

Selcuk University Archeology Department Made Excavations

The archeology department of Konya Selçuk University first conducted surveys on Giresun Island between 2009-2010. Archeological excavations on Giresun Island were carried out by again Konya Selçuk University Archeology Department between 2011-2012 under the Presidency of Giresun Museum.

The explanation, which mentions that some structures were partially unearthed on the island surrounded by walls with these studies, said: “Along with structures such as churches, towers, administrative buildings, chapels, and cisterns built on the medieval settlement, the harbor area and offering pits belonging to the Classical and Hellenistic periods were identified.”

Giresun Island archaeological excavations continued in 2015-2016-2017, and in these excavations, areas where various ceramics, frescoes, mosaics, used as wine cubes, Byzantine period coins, and many skeletons were unearthed.

Banner
Related Post

The Ancient City of Miletos’s “Sacred Cave” Opened to Visitors

2 October 2021

2 October 2021

In the ancient city of Miletos, which had an important place in the advancement of philosophy, art, and science in...

Antalya Museum Sheds Light on the Southern History of Anatolia

17 April 2021

17 April 2021

Antalya province on Turkey’s breathtaking Mediterranean, besides the incredible coastline, is besides quite remarkable that up with ancient artifacts and...

Archaeologists discover bones of a woman who lived 14,000 years ago at a site in The Iberian Peninsula

13 August 2021

13 August 2021

Archaeologists have discovered the bones of a lady who lived 14,000 years ago, the earliest traces of a modern burial...

3D printing technology was used for the restored relic restoration of an ancient palace in Liangzhu Archaeological Site

11 July 2021

11 July 2021

Six rebuilt massive wooden pillars of an old palace have been exposed to the public for the first time at...

Pandemics Determined the Fate of Wars in Ancient Times

7 April 2021

7 April 2021

Epidemics have been one of the factors affecting the fate of wars throughout history. Epidemics have sometimes turned the fate...

Archaeological Finding Traces Chinese Tea Culture Back To 400 BC

7 February 2022

7 February 2022

An archaeological team from Shandong University, east China’s Shandong Province, has found the earliest known tea remains in the world...

6,000-year-old Finds in Dorset Downs

11 June 2021

11 June 2021

In the Dorset Downs, a significant landscaping project has revealed a plethora of intriguing findings on a grand scale. Excavations...

A Monument complex and inscription belonging to Ilteris Kutlug Kagan, the founder of the Eastern Göktürk Khanate, were found

24 August 2022

24 August 2022

A Turkish inscription of İlteriş Kutlug Kağan was found during the joint scientific archaeological expedition of the International Turkic Academy...

Bone workshop and oil lamp shop unearthed in Aizanoi ancient city in western Turkey

13 November 2021

13 November 2021

Archaeologists have unearthed a bone workshop and an oil lamp shop in an Aizanoi ancient city in the Çavdarhisar district...

Who really fought in the Battle of Himera? Researchers found the answer to the question

14 May 2021

14 May 2021

According to the Ancient Greek Historians, victory over the Carthaginians in the Battle of Himera was won by the alliance...

Archaeologists Unearth 78,000-Year Oldest Human Burial

5 May 2021

5 May 2021

A 78,000-year-old group of bones discovered at the mouth of a Kenyan coastal cave constitutes the oldest recorded formal human...

Turkey to Present 12 Historic Artifacts to Istanbul Patriarch

10 August 2021

10 August 2021

The government said on Monday that Turkey will deliver stolen icons from ancient local churches to Istanbul’s Fener Greek Patriarch...

2000-year-old Ancient Greek ‘graduate school yearbook’ carved in stone found

5 June 2022

5 June 2022

Historians have discovered that an ancient Greek inscription on a marble slab in the collection of the National Museums of...

13,000-year-old Clovis campsite discovered in Michigan

10 September 2021

10 September 2021

In St. Joseph County, independent researcher Thomas Talbot and University of Michigan scholars uncovered a 13,000-year-old Clovis campsite, which is...

A new study in Portugal suggests that mummification in Europe may be older than previously thought

3 March 2022

3 March 2022

New research on the hunter-gatherer burial sites in the Sado Valley in Portugal, dating to 8,000 years ago, suggests that...

Comments
Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.