27 November 2022 The Future is the Product of the Past

A Little-Known Civilization in the Americas Built Pyramids as Old as Ancient Egypt

Considered the cradle of civilization in the Americas, the Sacred City of Caral-Supe is a 5000-year-old archaeological site, situated on a dry desert terrace, overlooking the green valley of the Supe River in Peru.

The Sacred City of Caral-Supe is a complex of pyramids and sunken circular courts only just discovered in 1948.

The Sacred City of Caral-Supe is home to an extraordinary complex of ancient monumental architecture built approximately 2600 B.C., around the same period as the first Egyptian pyramid. Archaeologists think Caral to be one of the largest and most sophisticated urban centers established by the Western Hemisphere’s earliest known civilization.

With a foundation that roughly equals four football fields in size, its biggest pyramid, also known as Pirámide Mayor, is almost 100 feet tall. The site has been estimated to be between 4,000 and 5,000 years old using radiocarbon dating on organic material, making its construction at least as old as the Step Pyramid of Saqqara, the oldest known pyramid in ancient Egypt.

The Sacred City of Caral-Supe
The Sacred City of Caral-Supe

Caral is now one of the oldest known cities in the Western Hemisphere, thanks to this astonishing find. Coastal Peru has long been thought to be one of the six acknowledged cradles of human civilisation, and fresh archaeological findings continue to push back the dates of the region’s “mother culture.”

To put things in context, the City of Caral-Supe flourished at the same time the Egyptians were constructing their pyramids. Caral society’s complexity as a sociopolitical state is reflected in the city’s structure and architecture, while artifacts discovered at the site, such as the quipu (the same knot system the Incas subsequently employed to store information), demonstrate the civilization’s influence on succeeding Andean civilizations.

The design of both the architectural and spatial components of the city is masterful, and the monumental platform mounds and recessed circular courts are powerful and influential expressions of a consolidated state.

Pirámide Mayor de Caral
Pirámide Mayor de Caral

Caral was the first of over two dozen fully excavated sites along Peru’s central coast known as the Norte Chico region. Archaeologists think the sites collectively reflect the Americas’ earliest core of civilization, which existed from 3000 to 1800 B.C. and was totally uninfluenced by outside factors. It flourished over 4,000 years before the mighty Incan Empire began.

The city design and several of its components, such as pyramidal structures and elite residences, clearly exhibit indications of ceremonial activities, signifying a powerful religious ideology.

No trace of warfare has been found at Caral: no battlements, no weapons, no mutilated bodies. Findings suggest it was a gentle society, built on commerce and pleasure.

In 2009, the City of Caral-Supe has declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site for its still visible representation of Late Archaic architecture and town planning, the highly-developed and complex culture that once inhabited it, and their influence on later Andean civilizations.

Cover Photo: Sacred City of Caral-Supe (Peru). Christopher Kleihege

Banner
Related Post

Royal-Memorial Inscription Attributed to King Sargon II Discovered in Western Iran

25 April 2021

25 April 2021

In western Iran, Iranian archaeologists discovered a part of a royal memorial inscription attributed to the Neo-Assyrian king Sargon II....

In northern Iran, a hand-dug passageway was discovered used for military purposes during the Qajar era

1 August 2021

1 August 2021

A hand-dug underground passage dating from the Qajar era (1794-1925), once believed to have served military purposes, has been discovered...

A farmer discovered artifacts of the Unetice culture in his field

19 August 2021

19 August 2021

A farmer in Sulęcin county in Poland’s Lubusz province discovered a rare treasure while trying to clear stones from his...

Ushabti figurines on display at Izmir Archeology Museum

18 September 2021

18 September 2021

The 2,700-year-old “Ushabti” statuettes, discovered in archaeological digs in western Turkey and used in Egyptian burial ceremonies, are being shown...

Digs at Turkey’s Seyitömer mound reveals thousands of artworks

20 March 2022

20 March 2022

Approximately 14,500 artifacts have been unearthed during rescue excavations carried out over 33 years at Seyitömer Mound in Turkey’s western...

A 2,000-Year-Old Shoe Discovered in a German Bog

22 June 2021

22 June 2021

Archaeologists discovered a leather shoe that had been lost in a bog for 2,000 years and believe it may have...

2,000-year-old Celtic hoard of gold ‘rainbow cups’ discovered in northeastern Germany

13 January 2022

13 January 2022

Archaeologists have found an ancient Celtic coins treasure consisting of 41 gold coins in a field in Brandenburg, a state...

Man-made Viking-era cave discovered in Iceland Bigger, Older Than Previously Thought

2 June 2022

2 June 2022

Archaeologists from the Archaeological Institute of Iceland have uncovered an extensive system of interconnected structures that are not only much...

The excavation, which started in a cave in Turkey’s Mardin, turned into a huge underground city

19 April 2022

19 April 2022

In an underground city known used as a settlement in the early Christian era, in the Midyat district of Mardin,...

Ancient Jordanian town referred to as Heshbon in the Old Testament provides insight into regional agricultural history

20 January 2022

20 January 2022

The American archaeologist stated that Tell Hisban, located on the Madaba plains of Jordan, represents the “granary of the empires”....

Jomon Ruins Adding to UNESCO World Heritage List

26 May 2021

26 May 2021

An international advisory panel has recommended that a group of ruins from the ancient Jomon period in northern Japan is...

The oldest evidence of human use of tobacco was discovered in Utah

11 October 2021

11 October 2021

According to recent research, burnt seeds discovered in the Utah desert suggest that humans used tobacco initially and that some...

A New Hypothesis Tries to Explain What Triggers People’s Big Brains

14 March 2021

14 March 2021

The big brain is the decisive feature of our species. Not only are they the most complex organs in the...

In southern Turkey, an ancient quake-damaged structure was discovered

9 November 2021

9 November 2021

In the ancient city of Perre in southeastern Turkey, a building damaged in an earthquake believed to have happened in...

New Discoveries of Sanxingdui Ancient City to be Announced

19 March 2021

19 March 2021

Sanxingdui, which literally means “Stacks of Three Stars”, is a cultural relic of the Kingdom of Shu in ancient China....

Comments
Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *