26 January 2023 The Future is the Product of the Past

Turkey’s Urartian Altıntepe Castle transforms into open museum

Altıntepe Castle, one of the most important centers of the Urartians and the Eastern Roman Empire, is now set to open to visitors after being converted into an open-air museum with excavations finishing at the site.

The 2,900-year-old Altıntepe Castle is in eastern Turkey is located on a 60-meter-high (196-feet-high) hill in the Üzümlü district, 14 kilometers (8.69 miles) northeast of Erzincan city center.

The artifacts discovered at the Urartian-era Altntepe Castle, which is located on the ancient Silk Road and has been turned into an open-air museum popularly known as the “archeopark,” are the sole examples of Urartian culture.

The first excavations in and around the Urartian castle, where hundreds of historical artifacts from 850 and 590 BC are located, were carried out between 1959-1967, under the leadership of the famous Turkish archaeologist Professor Doctor Tahsin Özgüç from Ankara University.

Professor Mehmet Karaosmanoğlu restarted the excavations in 2003 in collaboration with the Ministry of Culture and Tourism and Atatürk University, and they were finished in 2019.

An aerial view shows the 2,900-year-old Urartian-era Altıntepe Castle, in Erzincan, Turkey. (AA Photo)

The castle has been restored since the excavations and converted into an open-air museum by laying walking paths. Once landscaping work has been completed, the museum will be opened to visitors.

Provincial Culture and Tourism Director Arda Heb told Anadolu Agency (AA) that the excavations in Altıntepe Castle contributed significantly to Anatolian archaeology.

Heb explained that the castle was converted into an open-air museum after many years of excavations.

“The first excavations in Altıntepe Castle, which is 14 kilometers from our city center, were initiated by the late Professor Tahsin Özgüç in 1959, and our professor’s excavations continued until 1968. The second stage of excavations was carried out by Professor Mehmet Karaosmanoğlu between 2003 and 2020. In these studies, important architectural remains and artifacts belonging to the Urartian period have been found.”

Heb stated that Altıntepe is one of the most important settlements of the Urartian civilization that has survived to the present day.

An aerial view shows the 2,900-year-old Urartian-era Altıntepe Castle, in Erzincan, Turkey. (AA Photo)
An aerial view shows the 2,900-year-old Urartian-era Altıntepe Castle, in Erzincan, Turkey. (AA Photo)

“The Urartian period structures unearthed in Altıntepe have made significant contributions to Anatolian archeology and are the only examples of the culture they represent. The artifacts excavated from the castle are exhibited in the Anatolian Civilizations Museum in Ankara and have been evaluated in many articles and published books. Altıntepe Castle has survived to the present day and is an important settlement of the Urartian civilization.”

Heb stated that the site, which has been converted into an “archaeopark,” contains many historical remains.

“The inner castle structure and walls, the temple, the apadana (a large hypostyle hall), the warehouse building, the foundation remains of the open-air temple and three underground tomb rooms, all of which belong to the Urartian period, have been unearthed in the castle,” he said.

“In addition, the remains of a mosaic-based church decorated with animal figures from the post-Urartian period have survived to the present day. With the works carried out under the auspices of our Ministry of Culture and Tourism, the works are continuing to transform the castle into an archaeopark and serve as an open-air museum to our people.”

Banner
Related Post

An 8500-year-old wooden ladder remain was discovered at Çatalhöyük

12 April 2022

12 April 2022

Remains of the wooden ladder were discovered for the first time in Çatalhöyük, one of the best-preserved Neolithic settlements in...

46 Eagles in vivid color revealed on Ancient Egyptian temple ceiling

15 May 2022

15 May 2022

A joint German/Egyptian archaeological mission at the Temple of Esna on the west bank of the Nile, 35 miles south...

The Headless Corpses of Somersham was Victims of Roman Executions

30 May 2021

30 May 2021

Excavations at Knobb’s Farm in Somersham, Cambridgeshire, unearthed three small late Roman graves on the outskirts of an agricultural village....

350,000-Year-Old Human Settlement have been Discovered on the Arabian Peninsula

17 May 2021

17 May 2021

One of the world’s oldest Acheulean sites was found in the northern region of Hail in Saudi Arabia. Al Nasim...

Archaeologists revealed Urartian King Menua second temple in Van excavations

22 December 2022

22 December 2022

The second temple of King Menua as well as a chamber tomb were unearthed during the excavations carried out this...

1700-Year-Old ‘Cursed’ Sarcophagus on Display in Amasya Museum

30 March 2021

30 March 2021

Expressions made of Greek letters were encountered in the Roman sarcophagus found in the rescue excavation carried out by the...

Germany: 700-year-old Causeway Found Under Central Berlin Street

19 February 2022

19 February 2022

Archaeologists from the Landesdenkmalamt Berlin (LDA) made a sensational find during their excavation at Molkenmarkt: about 2.50 m below Stralauer...

“If this site (Sharda temple)is restored and conserved, it will attract thousands of Hindus and Buddhists from Kashmir and the rest of the world”

7 August 2021

7 August 2021

Sharda Peeth, a historic learning institution located 200 kilometers (124 miles) from Muzaffarabad, the capital and largest city of Pakistan-administered...

Stonehenge could be a solar calendar, according to a new study

2 March 2022

2 March 2022

A new study posits that the Stonehenge circles served as a calendar that tracks the solar year of 365.25 days,...

3600 years old Unique ancient drinking bowls on display at Boğazkale Museum

15 August 2021

15 August 2021

The 3,600-year-old fist-shaped drinking bowls found in excavations in Hattusa, the capital of the Hittite Civilization, which shaped the Anatolian...

Archaeologists found 5 unique sculptures representing the Kakatiya art style in Siddipet

19 July 2021

19 July 2021

13th-century statues were found near a temple tank in the Siddipet district in the northern province of Telangana, India. On...

Excavations at Aizanoi in Western Turkey to Resume

29 March 2021

29 March 2021

The ancient city of Aizanoi is located in the town of Çavdarhisar, 57 km from the center of Kütahya (Turkey’s...

A new Archaeological Site has been Discovered in Oman

7 July 2021

7 July 2021

Oman‘s Ministry of Heritage and Tourism recently discovered an ancient site in the town of Al Khobar, Sumail Province, Al...

Largest Anglo-Saxon cemetery discovered in Britain illuminates ‘Dark Ages’

16 June 2022

16 June 2022

Archaeologists working on HS2 (the purpose-built high-speed railway line) have discovered a rich Anglo-Saxon cemetery in Wendover, Buckinghamshire, where almost...

Sheikh Sultan Opened ‘Tales from the East’ Exhibition

28 April 2021

28 April 2021

The opening of the ‘Tales from the East’ exhibition organized by the Sharjah Book Authority (SBA) was held with the...

Comments
Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *