28 May 2024 The Future is the Product of the Past

The migration movement that started from Siberia 30,000 years ago may have shaped Göbeklitepe

Professor Semih Güneri, retired faculty member from Dokuz Eylul University (DEU) Caucasus Central Asia Archeology Research Center, stated that they have reached new archaeological documentation transferred from Siberia to Göbeklitepe, and said stone tools were found produced by printing method as proof of technology.

Professor Semih Güneri attended the “Proto-Turks Bearing Culture to the World Workshop” held in Istanbul on 11-13 June as an invited speaker.

Professor Semih Güneri made the first presentation of the Siberia-Göbeklitepe hypothesis, which they developed in recent years, in two separate sessions with his colleague Professor Ekaterine Lipnina.

Professor Güneri stated that there was a migration that started from Siberia 30 thousand years ago and spread to all of Asia and then to Eastern and Northern Europe, and stated that they followed these migrations through archaeological documents.

Proto-Turks Bearing Culture to the World Workshop.

Professor Güneri stated that the most important branch of migration extends to the Near East and said:

“The mass migrations from Siberia to the Zagros by using the Central Asian mountain corridor must have reached the Göbeklitepe culture areas via northern Iraq. According to the current results of our research with our Russian colleagues, concrete traces of stone tool industries produced by printing technology by Upper Paleolithic Siberian peoples, represented by the Early North Asian genetic group, in the region were previously revealed by our Russian and European colleagues.”

“We see the products of the printing micro blade technology developed by the old North Asian peoples since 30 thousand BC, in the Zagros Mountains region in the Early Holocene. The technology is then transferred to the Göbeklitepe culture. Although the Göbeklitepe culture represents an earlier period in the formation process, the Eastern Mediterranean Epi-Paleolithic cultures do not have a decisive role. The relationship of Göbeklitepe high culture with the carriers of Siberian pressed microblade stone tool technology is no longer a secret. The results of genetic analyzes of the Zagroslar region confirm the traces of the Siberian/North Asian indigenous peoples, who reached the Zagros via the Central Asian mountainous corridor and met and fused with the Göbeklitepe culture over northern Iraq.”

Microblade Technology in the Baykal region. Photo: Prof. Dr. Semih Güneri

Microblades are meticulously being taken out

Noting that they carried out research in the Baykal region in 2019, both at the excavation sites and at the laboratories, Prof. Dr. Semih Güneri pointed out that the study was published in the most respected archaeological peer-reviewed journal in Turkey and said, “The imprinted microblade we are working on are tiny cutters of 2-5 mm in size. These are precision tools used in the finest works by arranging them on bone material. The fact that our study was published in such a journal confirms our hypothesis. We have announced our work to wide circles for the first time at an international meeting, the Proto-Turks Bearing Culture to the World Workshop.”

“Migration movements are considered as migration only if they can be verified with archaeological documents,” said Prof. Dr. Guneri continued:

Prof. Dr. Semih Güneri
Prof. Dr. Semih Güneri. Photo: DHA

“The Siberian-Near East Upper Paleolithic migrations is a process that has been confirmed by material cultural documents. The stone tool production technology we are talking about obviously moved from east to west about 7 thousand kilometers. It is not clear whether this technology was transmitted over long distances directly by the earliest Turkic-speaking peoples or traveled long distances by being transported to intermediate stations, but still, from archaeological documents, we know that Siberian peoples reached the Zagros region. Relationships seem to have existed between Siberian hunter-gatherers and native Zagros hunter-gatherers. The results of genetic studies show that the Siberian peoples have already reached the Zagros. Such results may emerge when genetic studies are carried out on the Göbeklitepe culture region. The Siberia-Göbeklitepe hypothesis and the published article are the results of collaborative work with my PhD students.”

Related Articles

4750-year-old Megalithic Stone Plaza Discovered in the High Andes of Peru

15 February 2024

15 February 2024

Two anthropology professors from the University of Wyoming have discovered a prehistoric plaza high in the Andes, known as Callacpuma...

A rare Roman cornu mouthpiece found at Vindolanda

23 September 2022

23 September 2022

Just south of Hadrian’s Wall, archaeologists have discovered an extremely rare Roman cornu mouthpiece beneath the remains of the ancient...

Morocco team announces 1.3 million years major Stone Age find

29 July 2021

29 July 2021

A multinational team of archaeologists announced the discovery of North Africa’s oldest Stone Age hand-ax manufacturing site, going back 1.3...

An important Gallo-Roman worship complex was discovered near Rennes, France

13 June 2022

13 June 2022

An essential Gallo-Roman worship complex was unearthed by Inrap  (National Institute for Preventive Archaeological Research) archaeologists at Chapelle-des-Fougeretz (Ille-et-Vilaine), near...

Hundreds of silver coins have been found near the castle of Lukov in Moravia

4 September 2021

4 September 2021

In the forest near the Southern Moravian Fortress Lukov, two members of the Society of Friends of the Lukov Fortress...

5000-year-old stoneware workshop found in Iran

24 January 2023

24 January 2023

Iranian archaeologists found the ruins of a stoneware workshop estimated to date back to the 3rd millennium BC, during their...

Archaeologists find an Anglo-Saxon church at Stoke Mandeville excavation site

13 September 2021

13 September 2021

Archaeologists working on the HS2 project found the remains of an Anglo-Saxon church during their excavations at the former St...

At Ostrowite, archaeologists have discovered a high-status burial dating back almost a thousand years

2 January 2022

2 January 2022

Archaeologists have discovered a burial chamber in Ostrowite, in Poland’s Pomeranian Voivodeship, containing several high-status grave goods from the 11th...

The Headless Corpses of Somersham was Victims of Roman Executions

30 May 2021

30 May 2021

Excavations at Knobb’s Farm in Somersham, Cambridgeshire, unearthed three small late Roman graves on the outskirts of an agricultural village....

Researchers decipher enigmatic ancient ‘Unknown Kushan Script’

13 July 2023

13 July 2023

A research team at the University of Cologne’s Department of Linguistics deciphered a writing system belonging to the Kushan Empire,...

Roman gilded silver fragment uncovered in Norfolk baffles researchers

27 March 2023

27 March 2023

In Norfolk, a metal detector uncovered an ancient Roman fragment made of gilded silver. The piece was clearly a part...

The University of Aberdeen is to Return a Benin Bronze

5 April 2021

5 April 2021

Since Nigeria gained independence in 1960, Nigeria has been calling for the return of stolen Benin bronzes (including brass reliefs,...

A cave painting found in Egyptian Sahara depicts a nativity scene 3,000 years before Jesus’ Birth

21 December 2023

21 December 2023

5,000-year-old rock art depicting the oldest nativity scene ever found has been found in Egypt’s Sahara Desert: A newborn between...

Israeli researchers have found evidence of cooking fish 780,000 years ago at Gesher Benot Ya’aqov

14 November 2022

14 November 2022

Hominins living at Gesher Benot Ya’akov 780,000 years ago liked their fish to be well cooked, Israeli researchers revealed Monday,...

Ancient tomb chamber discovered in north China

3 January 2022

3 January 2022

Archaeologists have unearthed a tomb with a stone outer coffin dating back to the Northern Wei Dynasty (386-534) in north...