15 October 2021 The Future is the Product of the Past

The first Dutch Neanderthal’s ‘Krijn’ face was reconstructed

World-renowned “paleo-artists” Kennis brothers have reconstructed the face of the first Neanderthal in the Netherlands.

After more than 50,000 years, the first Neanderthal in the Netherlands, whose skull piece was displayed in 2009 in the National Museum of Antiquities in Leiden, has a face again.

Many reconstructions of Neanderthals and other prehistoric humans, like the glacial mummy Ötzi, were created by the Kennis brothers.

The Kennis brothers recreated Neanderthal’s face based on the distinguishing characteristics of this and other Neanderthal skulls: a young man with a noticeable bump over his right eye. The nodule is the result of a small tumor’, the National Museum of Antiquities announced.

In order to give him a scientifically reasonable face, paleoanthropological artists Kennis & Kennis Reconstructions were invited. In this task, they used the inspection features of the North Sea fossils, the number matching with the skulls of comparable Neanderthals, and the latest knowledge about Neanderthals and their appearances, such as eyes, hair, and skin color.

The young Neanderthal was dubbed Krijn by the researchers. Krijn lived in the ancient region that is now the North Sea more than 50,000 years ago. The water level was more than fifty meters lower back then than it is now. Mammoths, woolly rhinoceroses, reindeer, horses, and Neanderthals all traversed a frigid yet nutrient-rich steppe. The same-named exhibition at the National Museum of Antiquities is about these people and their environment, Doggerland.

The exhibition tells the story of almost a million years of human habitation, landscape, and climate change in the vast and rich prehistoric area off the Dutch coast. Krijn and the other finds show that further research and protection of the North Sea bed is of great scientific importance for Dutch and international archeology and paleontology.

The fossil and reconstruction of Krijn’s face may be viewed in the exhibition Doggerland at the National Museum of Antiquities from September 7 to October 31, 2021.

Source: Rijksmuseum Van Oudheden

Cover Photo: First Dutch Neanderthal gets facial reconstruction – Source: Servaas Neijens at Rijksmuseum van Oudheden

Banner
Related Post

Pompeii Reopening Antiquarium

6 February 2021

6 February 2021

The Antiquarium, a permanent museum within the Pompeii Archaeological pact, reopens. Opened in 1873, the Antiquarium was bombed during World...

Iron Age and Roman Skeletons Discovered on Alderney

19 May 2021

19 May 2021

Well-preserved skeletons from the late Iron Age and Roman periods were found in Alderney, one of the channel islands. The...

Archaeologists in Israel are restoring the largest Roman Basilica in the country

6 June 2021

6 June 2021

Archaeologists in Israel are trying to rebuild a 2,000-year-old Roman-era basilica that is thought to be the country’s biggest. A...

New insight into the history of human presence in Paveh county, Kermanshah province, which is located in western Iran

22 August 2021

22 August 2021

Stone tools and animal bones unearthed recently have thrown new insight into the history of human presence in Paveh county,...

350,000-Year-Old Human Settlement have been Discovered on the Arabian Peninsula

17 May 2021

17 May 2021

One of the world’s oldest Acheulean sites was found in the northern region of Hail in Saudi Arabia. Al Nasim...

Falaj al Misfah: Working for a thousand years

26 September 2021

26 September 2021

The village of Al Misfah Abriyeen is known for its lush oasis, magnificent orchards, and year-round water source, the ‘aflaj.’...

Archaeologists find a 5,000-year-old piece of wood in Orkney, which they describe as “astonishing”

10 August 2021

10 August 2021

Archaeologists continue to make surprising discoveries in Orkney. Although organic materials are quite difficult to find, archaeologists have found a...

Ancient Mythical Castle “Sörby Borg” Discovered on Swedish Island Creates Archaeological Sensation

4 August 2021

4 August 2021

A text from the early 18th century mentions the castle, which has become a bit of a legend. It has...

Archaeologists find an Anglo-Saxon church at Stoke Mandeville excavation site

13 September 2021

13 September 2021

Archaeologists working on the HS2 project found the remains of an Anglo-Saxon church during their excavations at the former St...

Archaeologists Uncover lost Indigenous Settlement of Sarabay, Florida

9 June 2021

9 June 2021

The University of North Florida archaeological team is now quite sure that they have uncovered Sarabay, a lost Indigenous northeast...

Millennia-Old İron Production Facilities Found in Iran

2 May 2021

2 May 2021

Archaeologists have uncovered many millennia-old iron manufacturing sites in a historical village in southcentral Iran. A local tourism official declared...

Egypt Traces Relics of Ramses III to the Arabian Peninsula

7 June 2021

7 June 2021

Following various findings showing ancient Egyptian King Ramses III had a presence on the Arabian Peninsula, an Egyptian archaeological team...

The oldest meerschaum artifact found in Anatolia; of Çavlum Seal

18 July 2021

18 July 2021

The stamp seal unearthed during the rescue excavations of Çavlum Village on the Eskişehir Alpu Plain is the oldest meerschaum...

The New Study Says the Iranian Plateau in the Pleistocene is a Bridge Between East and West

19 May 2021

19 May 2021

Iranian researchers say the Iranian plateau served as a migration route between East and West during the Pleistocene period, which...

Unexpected finds under the Tel Aviv Suburban

21 August 2021

21 August 2021

In preparation for a planned residential building project in suburban Tel Aviv, archaeologists from the Israel Antiquities Authority have begun...

Comments
Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *