3 March 2024 The Future is the Product of the Past

In northern Iran, a hand-dug passageway was discovered used for military purposes during the Qajar era

A hand-dug underground passage dating from the Qajar era (1794-1925), once believed to have served military purposes, has been discovered in northern Iran.

“An underground tunnel with an approximate length of 700 meters was recently discovered in Gol Sarak village in Gilan province,” said Vali Jahani, deputy provincial tourism head, on Monday.

The tunnel, which is equipped with underground stairs, ammunition slums, soldiers’ rooms, etc., is stretched in the north-south direction, and it probably dates from the Qajar era (1794–1925), the official added. (Tehran Times)

Jahani stated that more study and analysis should be performed to address questions such as the tunnel’s precise construction time, its usage during certain eras, and the manner in which building materials and water were given (by the original builders/users).

Gilan Province was the birthplace of the Buyid dynasty in the mid-tenth century. Previously, the province’s people held a significant role throughout the Sassanid dynasty until the 7th century, and their political authority reached all the way to Mesopotamia.

Gilan became a prominent silk manufacturer in the 15th century CE. As a result, it was one of Iran’s richest provinces. This cash source was at least largely responsible for Safavid’s annexation in the 16th century. The silk trade, though not the production, was a Crown monopoly and the imperial treasury’s single most significant source of trade revenue.

In the late 18th century CE, the Qajars created a central government in Persia (Iran). They lost a series of battles against Russia (Russo-Persian Wars 1804–1813 and 1826–28), resulting in the Russian Empire gaining considerable dominance in the Caspian area that lasted until 1946. Russians and Russian soldiers had almost completely captured and inhabited the Gilanian towns of Rasht and Anzali.

Russians and Russian soldiers had almost completely captured and inhabited the Gilanian cities of Rasht and Anzali. The majority of the region’s main cities had Russian schools, and substantial remnants of Russian culture may still be observed in Rasht today.

Russian classes were made mandatory in schools, and the considerable growth in Russian influence in the region continued until 1946, having a huge impact on Iranian history by directly leading to the Persian Constitutional Revolution.

Related Articles

Ancient tomb chamber discovered in north China

3 January 2022

3 January 2022

Archaeologists have unearthed a tomb with a stone outer coffin dating back to the Northern Wei Dynasty (386-534) in north...

Unique tombs wrapped in high-quality fabrics and painted bodies were discovered at monumental temple in Peru

11 March 2023

11 March 2023

Unique tombs wrapped in high-quality fabrics and painted bodies were discovered at the monumental temple in Peru. Located on the...

Saudi Arabia launching world’s first-ever ‘Museum in the Sky’

4 November 2021

4 November 2021

The world’s first “Museum in the Sky” flight operated by Saudia Airlines, will take off from Riyadh to AlUla today....

Archaeologists found a medieval skeleton with a prosthetic hand in Freising, Germany

28 October 2023

28 October 2023

Archaeologists in the city of Freising in Bavaria, Germany, unearthed containing a skeleton with a prosthetic hand. The metal part...

Women with Sart Renovate Largest Synagogue of Ancient World

4 August 2023

4 August 2023

Village women take part in the renovation works of the largest synagogue in the ancient world, located in the ancient...

The Oldest Known Map of Europe, “Saint-Bélec Slab”

6 April 2021

6 April 2021

An ornate Bronze Age stone slab (Saint-Bélec slab) that was excavated in France in 1900 and forgotten about for over...

New ancient ape from Türkiye challenges the story of human origins

2 September 2023

2 September 2023

A recently discovered fossilized ape from a site in Turkey that is 8.7 million years old is inspiring scientists to...

Medieval ship found off the west coast of Sweden

5 February 2022

5 February 2022

A previously undiscovered wreck has been found outside of Fjällbacka on the Swedish west coast. Analysis of wood samples shows...

Mystery ax discovered off the coast of Arendal of Norway

26 July 2021

26 July 2021

Researchers have discovered a find that could be a first for Norwegian archeology. A hollow ax, which researchers believe dates...

Archaeologists have found seven pairs of Anglo-Saxon brooches in seven graves during an excavation in Gloucestershire

5 April 2022

5 April 2022

Archaeologists have found seven pairs of Anglo-Saxon saucer brooches, one pair in each of seven burials unearthed in an excavation...

Archaeologists unearth the remains of three dozen headless people at a stone age settlement in Vráble, Slovakia

25 September 2022

25 September 2022

Archaeologists have unearthed a mass grave containing the remains of about three dozen headless bodies of people at a settlement...

The Mysterious Prehistoric Underwater Structure Beneath Lake Michigan

6 February 2024

6 February 2024

A prehistoric structure reminiscent of England’s iconic Stonehenge has been uncovered in Grand Traverse Bay, an arm of Lake Michigan...

‘Proof of biblical kings’, Israel deciphers 8th century BC Hezekiah inscription after a decade of research

17 December 2022

17 December 2022

Israeli archeologists have deciphered an 8th-century BC inscription discovered on a palm-sized stone tablet after a decade of research.  The...

Archaeologists discover secondary gate of old Bazira city in Pakistan

26 March 2022

26 March 2022

Archaeologists claimed to have discovered the secondary gate of the city of Bazira during new excavations at Barikot in Pakistan’s...

Will the Siloam Inscription be returned to Israel?

12 March 2022

12 March 2022

During the visit of Israeli President Isaac Herzog to Turkey, the claim that he wanted the Siloam Inscription, one of...