9 December 2022 The Future is the Product of the Past

Archaeologists discovered the monastery of Queen Cynethryth, a strong Anglo-Saxon queen

Archaeologists from the University of Reading and local volunteers excavating on the grounds of Holy Trinity Church have made an important discovery.

The team discovered the remnants of timber buildings that would have housed the monastery’s occupants, as well as items that provide insight into their life.

Archaeologists who have found the remains of an 8th-century monastery on the banks of the River Thames say the discovery may give them a unique insight into the life of its ruler, Queen Cynethryth, one of the most powerful women of the Early Middle Ages.

Until today, the actual location of the site in the Berkshire village of Cookham has remained a secret. The location of the monastery had not been found, although it is well-known from contemporary historical sources. It was ruled by a royal abbess, Queen Cynethryth, the widow of the strong King Offa of Mercia, according to written sources.

Dr. Gabor Thomas, Archaeologist, University of Reading said: “By the end of the 9th it was being ruled over by a very powerful royal widow called Queen Cynethryth who was the widow of one of the most powerful Kings of 8th century England – King Offa.

Many historians believe that King Offa was the most powerful Anglo-Saxon king before Alfred the Great. He is most remembered for commanding the construction of the earthen barrier known as Offa’s Dyke on the boundary between England and Wales, which can still be seen today.

Anglo Saxon monastery2
Photo: University of Reading

After her husband, King Offa, died in AD 796, Cynethryth joined a religious order and became the royal abbess of the monastery. He governed Mercia, one of the most important Anglo-Saxon kingdoms in Britain, which encompassed the English Midlands, until his death.

Cynethryth is the only Anglo-Saxon queen portrayed on a coin, which was unusual in Western Europe at the time. She died after the year 798.

Dr. Thomas said: “Cynethryth is a fascinating figure, a female leader who clearly had genuine status and influence in her lifetime. Not only were coins minted with her image, but it is known that when the powerful European leader Charlemagne wrote to his English counterparts, he wrote jointly to both King Offa and Queen Cynethryth, giving both equal statuses.

Dr. Thomas also added that this is probably the queen’s final resting place. Archaeologists hope the discovery of the monastery Queen Cynethryth presided over will give them a unique insight into her life and times.

The team uncovered a plethora of evidence, including food remnants, pottery vessels used for cooking and dining, and pieces of personal clothing, such as a beautiful bronze bracelet and a dress pin, which were most likely used by female members of the society.

There is clear evidence for the monastery’s layout, which was arranged into a number of functional zones delineated by ditched borders. One of these zones appears to have been used for habitation, while another appears to have been utilized for industrial activities, as evidenced by a cluster of hearths that were most likely used for metalworking.

Banner
Related Post

Archaeologists find the largest bronze beast of Sanxingdui ruins

4 September 2022

4 September 2022

The largest and only one of its kind discovered in China to date, the bronze beast was discovered by archaeologists...

1500-Year-Old Petroglyphs Found in Central Iran

13 April 2021

13 April 2021

Researchers have discovered 70 petroglyphs carved into the rock that they think is from the Sassanid era. The petroglyphs were...

The Error That Caused II.Ramses to Lose the Battle of Kadesh

5 February 2021

5 February 2021

The Battle of Kadesh between the Hittites and Egyptians in Anatolia, the two superpowers of the Bronze Age period, has...

An Urartian fortress was discovered at an altitude of 3,300 meters in eastern Turkey

2 July 2022

2 July 2022

In the Gürpınar district of Van, located in eastern Turkey, a fortress ruin, which is considered to be used by...

“Scythian golds” will be returned to Ukraine

15 November 2021

15 November 2021

The fate of the Scythian Golds, which were sent to be exhibited in the Allard Pierson Museum before the Russian...

700-Year-Old Church Becomes a Museum

31 January 2021

31 January 2021

It was learned that the 7-century-old church in Akçaabat, Trabzon will serve as a museum from now on. St. The...

Archaeologists are deciphering Roman history along Dere Street, one of the oldest roadways in Britain

17 July 2021

17 July 2021

Final archaeological finds uncovered as part of a major road improvement in the north of England have shed new insight...

Archeologists Unearth Spectator snacks from the Roman Period in Colosseum

28 November 2022

28 November 2022

An excavation of the Colosseum’s sewer systems has uncovered a selection of spectator snacks from the Roman Period. It appears...

Tomb of an Urartian buried with his dog, cattle, sheep, and 4 horses unearthed

6 September 2021

6 September 2021

In ancient times, the dead were buried with their living and non-living things. The offerings placed as dead gifts varied...

409 silver coins, found in the Mleiha area of Sharjah, were inspired by Alexander the Great and the Seleucid dynasty

17 July 2021

17 July 2021

409 silver coins dating to the 3rd century have been found in the Mleiha area of Sharjah in the United...

Oldest Recorded Gynecological Treatment

7 February 2021

7 February 2021

In their latest research, scientists have come across a treatment practice in a mummy from 4000 years ago, as written...

Man-made Viking-era cave discovered in Iceland Bigger, Older Than Previously Thought

2 June 2022

2 June 2022

Archaeologists from the Archaeological Institute of Iceland have uncovered an extensive system of interconnected structures that are not only much...

Researchers measure the impact of Population Pressure on Prehistoric Violence in Japan’s Yayoi Period

23 August 2021

23 August 2021

Are wars part of human nature? Do people tend to fight instinctively or do they war as a result of...

A 1000-year-old Viking silver treasure found in Sweden

31 October 2022

31 October 2022

Archaeologists have discovered a 1,000-year-old silver Viking treasure at Täby, Viggbyholm, outside of Stockholm. The treasure was found during an...

The 1,000-year-old Church found under a cornfield in Germany

2 July 2021

2 July 2021

The foundation walls of the large church of the rediscovered Royal Palace of Helfta in Eisleben in the German state...

Comments
Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *