3 February 2023 The Future is the Product of the Past

Some interesting facts regarding its use the Galata Tower in Istanbul

The Galata Tower is one of Istanbul’s most recognizable landmarks, and its bright lights can be seen from all across the city at night.

The Galata Tower, or Galata Kulesi in Turkish, is one of Istanbul’s tallest and oldest structures. The 63-meter-high (206-foot-tall) tower offers a panoramic perspective of the ancient town.

Although the precise date of construction is unknown, the Galata Tower was erected in the 14th century by the Genoese colony as part of the fortification wall encircling their area at Galata, immediately opposite ancient Constantinopolis.

The Genoese called the tower the ‘Christea Turris,’ or Christ’s Tower, while the Byzantines called it the ‘Megalos Pyrgos,’ or Great Tower.

Galata tower was used for different purposes over time. Genoese were involved in trade with the Byzantines and the tower was used for the surveillance of the Harbor in the Golden Horn. After the conquest of Constantinople by Mehmet II, it served to detect fires in the city.

Galata Tower
Galata Tower

The tower was severely damaged by an earthquake in 1509, but it was repaired by Hayreddin, the great Ottoman architect who also erected the renowned Sultan Bayezid II complex in Edirne. The tower served a completely different role during the time of Ottoman Sultan Süleiman the Magnificent, as it was used to house captives sentenced to labor at the Kasimpaşa Naval Dockyard. By the end of the 16th century, the astronomer Takiyüddin Efendi had erected an observatory at the very top, but the tower was destined to become a jail once again under the reign of Sultan Murat III from 1546 to 1595.

The tower was temporarily utilized by the Mehter Band, an Ottoman military band, in the 17th century before becoming a fire observatory in 1717 due to its magnificent birds-eye perspective of the ancient city. The tower was damaged by fire in 1794, but it was rebuilt under Sultan Selim III’s reign, with the addition of a cumba (alcove). Following the devastating consequences of the second fire in 1831, Sultan Mahmut commissioned the tower to be once more restored, with the addition of two additional stories and a conical-shaped apex.

galata-tower-istanbul-night
Galata Tower night.

In time, interesting stories were added to the ever-changing usage areas of the Galata tower. One of the most well-known stories is the renowned Ottoman aviator Hezarfen Ahmet Çelebi.

During the Ottoman Empire’s 17th century, Hezarfen Ahmet Celebi was the first flying Turk. He researched air movements and mimicked bird wings before leaping from the Galata Tower and flying over the Bosphorus, landing in the Uskudar neighborhood on the Asian side, about 6 kilometers (4 miles) away. Due to this spectacular feat, Sultan Murad Khan allegedly grew suspicious of the man and sent him to exile in Algeria.

Galata Tower was restored after the Republic and reopened to the public in 1967.

Nowadays, the 219ft (66.90 meters) high tower is now just a tourist attraction, with people queuing to go to the top for a stunning 360-degree view of Istanbul from the balcony. Fortunately, an elevator carries tourists up seven levels, but the final two floors can only be reached by ascending the stairs.

Banner
Related Post

Unsolvable Megalithic Mystery of ancient Greek “Dragon Houses”

4 July 2022

4 July 2022

The Dragon Houses of Euboea, which probably dates to the Preclassical period of ancient Greece, are one of the historical...

A Pagan cemetery belongs to the Late Roman Empire period in Istanbul

12 June 2022

12 June 2022

During the restoration of the ancient Sheikh Suleiman Mosque, which was restored as part of the Med-Art Education Project by...

Jordan’s mysterious ancient wall “Khatt Shebib”

22 October 2022

22 October 2022

The accomplishments of ancient civilizations are typically woefully underappreciated because we stereotype them as primitives who only wore loincloths, and...

Bristol Redcliff Quarter’s outstanding medieval knife

17 May 2022

17 May 2022

In 2017 and 2018, Cotswold Archeology and Oxford Archeology, in a joint venture, undertook excavations ahead of redevelopment at Redcliff...

Khirbet Midras pyramid and  Archaeological Site in Israel

28 November 2022

28 November 2022

Khirbet Midras (Arabic) or Horvat Midras (Hebrew) is one of several antiquities sites located within the Adullam Grove National Park,...

Rare African Script Offers Clues to the Evolution of Writing Systems

4 February 2022

4 February 2022

The world’s very first invention of writing took place over 5000 years ago in the Middle East, before it was...

Iran’s legendary ruined city “Susa”

12 August 2021

12 August 2021

Ancient Susa is one of the oldest cities in the world. The Elamite, Persian, and Parthian empires formerly ruled over...

Famous Celtic hero bust of the Czech Republic “The head of Mšecké Žehrovice”

5 May 2022

5 May 2022

Located in the Czech Republic, the Mšecké Žehrovice’s head makes an appealing piece with its delightful curling mustaches- “perhaps the...

Life continues in Iran’s 12,000-year-old settlement “Meymand village”

8 February 2022

8 February 2022

At the south-eastern Iranian province of Kerman near Shahr-Babak city, there is a village dating back to the Stone Age....

700 Years After Dante’s Death, His Handwritten Notes Are Discovered

11 July 2021

11 July 2021

Dante Alighieri, an Italian poet, and scholar are best known for his masterwork La Commedia (also known as The Divine...

The mystery of Cathedral of Salamanca’s astronaut figure, isn’t what people think it is

10 March 2022

10 March 2022

There is a photograph of an “astronaut” carved in a 16th century Spanish cathedral in Salamanca. Known as the Catedral...

Unique work of Minoan art, the Pylos Combat Agate must be the David of the Prehistoric era

21 November 2021

21 November 2021

Found in a Greek tomb dating back 3,500 years, the artifact is so well designed that it looks as lively...

Seven Roman altars multicolored in the Great Northern Museum

12 November 2021

12 November 2021

We know that the ancient world is now very colorful. But these colors weren’t just limited to robes and other...

Michelangelo, the artistic giant, was actually rather short

3 September 2021

3 September 2021

The legendary Michelangelo Buonarroti left huge works behind as an artist. But Italian researchers found that the shoes of this...

500-year-old Inca mummy, as if in a deep sleep “La Doncella”

24 August 2021

24 August 2021

Three Inca mummies found near the high Volcán Llullaillaco peak in Argentina in 1999 stunned all scientists. The 3 Incas...

Comments
Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *