14 April 2024 The Future is the Product of the Past

Saudi shipwreck excavation reveals hundreds of 18th-century artifacts on sunken ship in the north Red Sea

Divers from Saudi Arabia’s Heritage Authority have discovered a shipwreck in the Red Sea from the 18th century filled with hundreds of artifacts, just off the coast of Hall, in the Kingdom’s northwest.

Archaeologists believe indicate that the ship may have had a collision with coral reefs that led to the scattering of its parts and its contents being spread around.

According to a statement issued by the Saudi Heritage Commission, an archaeological mission led by five Saudi divers located the wreck of the sunken ship, and “the survey was documented by a set of three-dimensional photographs and the identification of the area containing these sunken antiquities.”

There are more than 50 shipwrecks along the Saudi coast.
A Saudi archaeological mission discovered hundreds of antique pieces that were part of a sunken ship in the Red Sea, about 300 meters from the coast of Haql (Northwest of Saudi Arabia). (SPA)

The pottery pieces, SPA reported, are from amphora manufactured in the Mediterranean basin. According to a statement by the commission, the evidence revealed that the ship’s voyage dated back to the late 18th century.

The commission is conducting surveys and excavations for submerged artifacts in the Red Sea in collaboration with foreign universities and research organizations. More than 50 sunken shipwreck sites were discovered around the Red Sea as a consequence of the survey effort, ranging in historical and archaeological importance and date.

The ship was found 300 metres off shore.
The ship was found 300 metres off shore.

Archaeologists from the University of Napoli found the largest and most complete wooden shipwreck in the Red Sea. It contained jars, porcelain, and spices, having sunk between 1725 and 1750 in Al Wajh lagoon. The team are still curating and cataloging the finds, which will be split between the Red Sea Museum in Jeddah and the Red Sea Project.

The ruins of a Roman shipwreck in the Red Sea were discovered by a combined Saudi-German team surveying underwater historical sites on the west coast from 2012 to 2017. It is the oldest archaeological shipwreck discovered along the Saudi coast thus far. In a place between Rabigh and Shuaiba, the crew also unearthed another wreckage from the early Islamic era.

Red Sea Project

Related Articles

Scientists reveal new discovery inside the Pyramid of Khufu

20 March 2023

20 March 2023

An Egyptian pyramid for 4,500 years is still spilling secrets. After a years-long project using modern technology to reveal the...

A 2100-year-old inscription found İn Türkiye: Antiochos of Commagene calls on the people to ‘obey and respect the law’

15 March 2024

15 March 2024

The ancient inscription found near Kımıldağı (Kımıl Mount) in Önevler village of Adıyaman’s Gerger district in 2023 will shed light...

Irish archaeologists discover a rare 1,600-year-old idol in the Roscommon bog

13 August 2021

13 August 2021

A 1,600-year-old wooden pagan idol has been discovered in a bog in Co Roscommon by Irish archaeologists. This rare artifact...

Roman influence period artifacts discovered by history enthusiasts in northern Poland

16 March 2024

16 March 2024

Local history enthusiasts from the Wendrusz Historical and Exploration Society have discovered four fibulae, a ring, and fragments of decorations...

Excavations in and around Yazıkaya, one of the monumental works of the Phrygians, start again after 71 years.

23 July 2022

23 July 2022

Archaeological excavations at Midas Castle in Yazılıkaya Midas Valley in the Han district of Eskişehir, located in northwest Turkey, will...

Archaeologists unearth 6,000-year-old two monumental mounds containing wooden grave chambers in Germany

16 March 2024

16 March 2024

Archaeologists from the State Office for Heritage Management and Archaeology Saxony-Anhalt (LDA) have uncovered a significant Neolithic burial landscape on...

Dog Kajtuś uncovers Poland’s biggest treasure of the past 100 years

21 April 2022

21 April 2022

A dog named Kajtuś discovered the biggest treasure found in Poland in the last 100 years. The treasure was found...

A Dice Game board from 5th century BC found in western Turkey’s Daskyleion

6 September 2023

6 September 2023

Archaeologists found a terracotta dice game tabla dating back to the fifth century B.C. during the excavations of the ancient...

Medallion of Emperor Caracalla Minted in Pergamon Found in Roman Tombs in Bulgaria

13 February 2024

13 February 2024

One of the valuable discoveries from the Roman tombs discovered near the village of Nova Varbovka in Strazhitsa municipality in...

Luxurious Feather Beds of Iron Age Warriors

27 March 2021

27 March 2021

According to a new study, two warriors from the 7th century in Sweden were buried in graves where they were...

Archaeologists unearth a portrait of a king carved into stone in a 4,300-year-old Chinese Pyramid

9 August 2022

9 August 2022

A team of archaeologists say they have found what could be the portrait of a king carved into stone at...

Researchers found similar descriptions in the Book of Revelation and ancient curse tablets

10 February 2023

10 February 2023

A research project headed by Dr. Michael Hölscher of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU), has uncovered that the book of...

Largest ever Roman silver hoard in Germany found in Augsburg

12 November 2021

12 November 2021

Archaeologists in Augsburg, Germany, revealed unearthed a historical hoard including 15 kg of silver coins from the Roman Empire’s era....

The Earliest Evidence of a Domesticated Dog in the Arabian Peninsula

9 April 2021

9 April 2021

Dogs have been the best friend of humans since ancient times. Although it is not known exactly when dogs were...

Royal-Memorial Inscription Attributed to King Sargon II Discovered in Western Iran

25 April 2021

25 April 2021

In western Iran, Iranian archaeologists discovered a part of a royal memorial inscription attributed to the Neo-Assyrian king Sargon II....