9 December 2022 The Future is the Product of the Past

“Important discovery” showing that the Hittite city of Büklükale close ties with the Hurrian society

According to Japanese archaeologists, an ancient clay tablet discovered at the Büklükale ruins in central Turkey suggests that a little-known rival ethnic group was closely involved in the establishment of the Hittite Empire more than 3,000 years ago.

Büklükale has located about 100 km from Ankara, the capital city of Turkey, where the route from Ankara to Kaman crosses the Kızılırmak, the longest river in Turkey. This location has been a key transportation crossroads since ancient times, and Büklükale has controlled it.

The text engraved on the tablet found in Büklükale was in the language of the Hurrians, who are believed to have been once powerful enough to vie for hegemony in the ancient Orient with the Hittites and the Egyptians.

After reaching its peak under King Hammurabi, Babylonia, a kingdom in Mesopotamia to the southeast of Anatolia, began to show signs of decline around the time the Hittite Empire was established. To the south, the kingdom of Egypt was also politically unstable, owing in part to invasions by other ethnic groups.

Archaeologists hope to learn how Anatolia, the Hittite’s central base, was influenced by surrounding areas, as well as how different ethnic groups and cultures rose and fell in the ancient Orient.

The clay tablet, measuring about 3 centimeters, was unearthed in June near palace remains in Buklukale, the ruins of a Hittite urban settlement that expedition members believe had ties with the royal family.

Japanese Institute of Anatolian Archaeology (JIAA) officials said: An adobe building more than 50 meters long, presumably a palace, likely stood on the hilltop in its central part during the Hittite Empire, which flourished roughly from 1,700 B.C. to 1,200 B.C.

“The clay tablet has major implications for the ties between the Hittite royal family and the Hurrians,” said associate professor Kimiyoshi Matsumura, a researcher who heads an expedition of the Japanese Institute of Anatolian Archaeology (JIAA).

“We hope to shed light on details of the role that the Hurrians, who must have been a nemesis for the Hittites, played in the formation process of the Hittite Empire, which went on to prosper with its ironmaking technologies, the foundation of our contemporary society.”

The text engraved on the tablet pertained to a Hurrian religious ritual called purification. According to officials, the tablet’s calligraphic style indicates that it was created during the cradle years of the Hittite Empire.

The Mitanni Kingdom was created by the Hurrians, who were people who lived about 1,000 kilometers to the southeast and in a region that stretched from modern-day Syria to northern Mesopotamia. The kingdom, which flourished roughly between 1,500 and 1,300 B.C., has remained a mystery. Even its capital, known only by the name of Wassukkani, has yet to be located.

Mark Weeden, an associate professor of ancient Middle Eastern languages with University College London, told the Asahi Shimbun that the latest find is a “key discovery” that shows Buklukale, an important site for the Hittite royal family since the early days of the Hittite Empire, had close ties with the Hurrian population.

“There are only three other places in Hittite territory where Hurrian clay tablets have been unearthed, all of which are known to have been closely associated with the Hittite royal family,” said Weeden, who worked with the JIAA expedition as a decipherer of Hurrian texts on clay tablets.

“In addition to evidence for large-scale rituals, clay tablets related to religious rituals written in ancient Hurrian were unearthed at the Buklukale ruins, suggesting that rituals in the Hurrian language were probably performed there by the Hittite royal family.”

Since 1986, the JIAA, which is affiliated with the Middle Eastern Culture Center in Japan, has been excavating in Anatolia. The institute is currently conducting research at three sites, one of which is Buklukale, where excavations began in 2009.

Banner
Related Post

Researchers measure the impact of Population Pressure on Prehistoric Violence in Japan’s Yayoi Period

23 August 2021

23 August 2021

Are wars part of human nature? Do people tend to fight instinctively or do they war as a result of...

In Ryazan, the first birch bark letters were discovered

13 September 2021

13 September 2021

The first birch bark letters were found at the Vvedensky excavation site in the Kremlin in Pereyaslavl Ryazan (modern Ryazan)....

10,000-year-old rock art discovered in the Indian village of Medikonda

3 July 2021

3 July 2021

Rock art containing tiger, human and animal figures was found at the Jogulamba Gadwal site in Telangana, India. The New...

12,000-year-old ‘public building’ unearthed in southeastern Turkey’s Mardin

27 September 2022

27 September 2022

Archaeologists have discovered the remains of a “public building” thought to be 12,000 years old at Boncuklu Tarla in the...

An ancient “fridge” have uncovered at the Roman legionary fortress of Novae, Bulgaria

30 September 2022

30 September 2022

Polish archaeologists, during excavations at the Roman legionnaires’ camp in Novae, discovered a container that could be described as an...

Archaeologists find sunken ancient Egyptian warship under Abu Qir Bay

26 July 2021

26 July 2021

According to a press release by the Egyptian Ministry of Tourism and Antiquities, the Egyptian French archaeological mission of the...

The Error That Caused II.Ramses to Lose the Battle of Kadesh

5 February 2021

5 February 2021

The Battle of Kadesh between the Hittites and Egyptians in Anatolia, the two superpowers of the Bronze Age period, has...

Multiple Burials found at Çatalhöyük

17 September 2021

17 September 2021

Multiple burials were unearthed during the ongoing excavations in the house on the eastern mound of the Neolithic settlement Çatalhöyük....

4,500-year-old rare Canaanite goddess sculpture found by a farmer in Gaza Strip

25 April 2022

25 April 2022

A farmer in the city of Khan Yunis, in the southern Gaza Strip, found a rare 4,500-year-old stone sculpture while...

2,700-year-old bronze figurine found in Germany’s Tollence River: goddess or weight?

9 April 2022

9 April 2022

A Bronze Age female figurine discovered in the Tollense River in northern Germany may have been a goddess, part of...

A 500-year-old mural linked to an Aztec god was found under layers of paint in Mexican Church

15 October 2022

15 October 2022

A mural of an Aztec rabbit God of alcohol is not something anyone expects to see inside a church, but...

The Cairo University archaeological mission unearths the tomb of Ramses II’s royal treasurer at Saqqara necropolis

1 November 2021

1 November 2021

Archaeologists working at the Saqqara necropolis have unearthed the tomb of Ptah-M-Wiah, a high-ranking ancient Egyptian official and head of...

Archaeologists discover bones of a woman who lived 14,000 years ago at a site in The Iberian Peninsula

13 August 2021

13 August 2021

Archaeologists have discovered the bones of a lady who lived 14,000 years ago, the earliest traces of a modern burial...

In the Black Sea, there is a “Ship Graveyard” with 2,500 years of wrecked ships

15 February 2022

15 February 2022

The Black Sea is the inland sea lying between Europe and Asia. Blacksea is located in Eurasia, surrounded by Europe,...

Evidence of Medieval Plague Victims Buried With “Significant Care” Found

23 June 2021

23 June 2021

The Black Death, which killed between 40 and 60% of Europe’s population in the mid-14th century, was a devastating epidemic...

Comments
Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *