11 August 2022 The Future is the Product of the Past

The excavations in Selinunte, Italy, which has the largest Agora in the Ancient World, “The results have gone well beyond expectations”

In the Selinunte, one of the most important archaeological sites of the Greek period in Italy, the outlines of the largest agora of the ancient world, with an area of ​​33.000 square meters, were unearthed.

Important discoveries regarding the 6th century BC history of Selinunte were made during the excavations of the Agora and the Acropolis.

Selinus (modern Selinunte), located on the southwest coast of Sicily, lying on two hills (the Akropolis and Manuzza Hill) connected by a narrow isthmus and bordered by rivers.

The agora of Selinunte was the biggest in the ancient world, measuring more than eight acres and being twice as big as Rome’s Piazza del Popolo. The Agora was at the center of the settlement and was surrounded by public buildings and residential quarters, connected to the Acropolis by a narrow strip of land and developing largely to the north. Excavations have previously revealed only one archaeological feature under the agora: an empty tomb in the middle of the square, perhaps that of the founder.

“The results have gone well beyond expectations,” said Professor Clemente Marconi.

Ivory Siren

 After two years in which work slowed due to the pandemic, excavation work resumed in June. This year’s excavation began in an area south of the acropolis with the aim of more precise dating of the newest of the A and O acropolis temples, long believed to have been built at the same time. The dig found evidence that A actually predates O, and that O was never completed because construction was interrupted by a landslide.

The most important discovery, however, was that of an aquifer under the foundations of the temple. This discovery confirmed the hypothesis that the Greek colonies settled precisely in this southern region of the Acropolis.

Archaeologists discovered a boundary wall dating back to 610 BC, not long after the arrival of the colonies led by Pammilus, while digging in depth around the third temple, known as R, which was built in the sixth century BC and possibly rebuilt after the Carthaginians occupied and destroyed the city in 409 BC. Remains of stone structures and animal bones point to altars on which rituals were celebrated.

Bronze scepter mold.
Bronze scepter mold.

The team also found a sizable piece of a stone mold used to create what seemed to be a bronze scepter within Temple R. Once it was cast, the two halves of the matrix were deposited in different locations. Ten years ago, the first part was found close by. A siren figurine carved from ivory and an Egyptian blue figurine of the sky deity Horus from the late 7th century B.C. were the other two noteworthy items discovered in Temple R. The carving’s exceptional quality is comparable to votives discovered at the Oracle of Apollo at Delphi, one of the most important religious sites from antiquity. So, according to archaeologists, the siren was probably brought over from Greece.

Selinus (modern Selinunte) was one of the most important Greek settlements in the West during the Archaic and Classical periods.

The city was famous throughout the ancient world for the richness of its farmland and its majestic temples. It flourished from the second half of the seventh century BCE until the end of the third century BCE, and its public spaces, temples, fortifications, and houses have been extraordinarily well preserved.

The excavation campaign is being carried out by the German Archaeological Institute in Rome in cooperation with the Institute of Fine Arts at New York University and the University of Milan, under the direction of Professor Clemente Marconi.

Cover Photo: Agora

Banner
Related Post

Archaeologists unearth human spines threaded onto reed posts in Peru

5 February 2022

5 February 2022

Archaeologists have found almost 192 examples of human vertebrae threaded onto reed posts 500 years ago in the Chincha Valley...

Dog Kajtuś uncovers Poland’s biggest treasure of the past 100 years

21 April 2022

21 April 2022

A dog named Kajtuś discovered the biggest treasure found in Poland in the last 100 years. The treasure was found...

10,000-year-old rock art discovered in the Indian village of Medikonda

3 July 2021

3 July 2021

Rock art containing tiger, human and animal figures was found at the Jogulamba Gadwal site in Telangana, India. The New...

Archaeologists have discovered a 2800-year-old Urartian Castle in eastern Turkey

17 June 2021

17 June 2021

Archaeologists discovered the ruins of a castle going back 2,800 years on a mountain 2,500 meters (8,200 feet) above sea...

Archaeologists have discovered the remains of a stone circle in the Castilly Henge, located in Cornwall, England

20 May 2022

20 May 2022

Archaeologists have unearthed a mysterious stone circle at the center of a prehistoric ritual site near Bodmin in Cornwall, located...

‘Miniature Pompeii’ found beneath Astra cinema in Verona

15 June 2021

15 June 2021

Archaeologists have uncovered a “miniature Pompeii” in the shape of a well-preserved ancient edifice near Verona, Italy. An old Roman...

The oldest meerschaum artifact found in Anatolia; of Çavlum Seal

18 July 2021

18 July 2021

The stamp seal unearthed during the rescue excavations of Çavlum Village on the Eskişehir Alpu Plain is the oldest meerschaum...

Illegal digs reveal rare Roman-era mass grave in Turkey

28 July 2022

28 July 2022

A total of 27 skeletons were found in a burial pit carved into the rocks in Adıyaman province, an important...

A unique gold brooch talisman with inscriptions in Latin and Hebrew was found in the UK

19 February 2022

19 February 2022

A Medieval gold annular brooch with prayerful inscriptions has been discovered in the parish of Manningford in Wiltshire, in the...

A secret chamber has been found in the famous Gorham Cave Complex

29 September 2021

29 September 2021

A cave chamber sealed off by sand for some 40,000 years has been discovered in Vanguard Cave inside the Gorham’s...

Archaeologists may have uncovered a 13th-century castle in Shropshire

7 August 2021

7 August 2021

Archaeologists have been working on a mound of land in Wem, Shropshire, that belongs to Soulton Hall, Elizabethan mansion and...

Ancient city “Germanicia” lost in 73 years

8 July 2021

8 July 2021

The presence of the ancient city of Germanicia, discovered during an illegal excavation in the southeast Turkish province of Kahramanmaraş...

Researchers find 3,000-year-old shark attack victim in Japan

24 June 2021

24 June 2021

In a paper published today, Oxford-led researchers reveal their discovery of a 3,000-year-old victim—attacked by a shark in the Seto...

8,000-year-old Yarmukian ‘Mother Goddess’ figurine discovered in Israel

9 July 2022

9 July 2022

An 8,000-year-old Yarmukian Mother Goddess figurine was found at Sha’ar HaGolan archaeological site, located on the northern bank of the...

The New Study Says the Iranian Plateau in the Pleistocene is a Bridge Between East and West

19 May 2021

19 May 2021

Iranian researchers say the Iranian plateau served as a migration route between East and West during the Pleistocene period, which...

Comments
Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.