14 April 2024 The Future is the Product of the Past

Archaeologists unearth 3,500-Year-Old Gold Jewelry in Egypt

Archaeologists discovered a collection of ornate jewelry at the Tell El-Amarna necropolis on the Nile River’s eastern bank in modern-day Minya, Egypt. Finds comprises three rings and one necklace.

The necropolis was the burial ground for the city of Amarna, constructed in 1346 BC to serve as the capital city of the Pharaoh Akhenaten, the 10th ruler of the late Eighteenth Dynasty.

A team of Egyptian and English archaeologists discovered a young woman wrapped in textile and plant-fiber matting and buried wearing a necklace with petal-shaped pendants as well as three rings made of gold and soapstone during excavations at the Amarna North Desert Cemetery.

Gold jewellery discovered in Amarna. Photo: Ministry of Tourism & Antiquities
Gold jewellery discovered in Amarna. Photo: Ministry of Tourism & Antiquities

The image of the ancient Egyptian deity Bes—who, with his feminine counterpart Beset, was worshiped as a protector of households, particularly mothers, children, and childbirth—was depicted on one of the rings. The other two are inscribed with a phrase in hieroglyphics that translates into “lady of the two lands”, presumably referring to Egypt’s lower and upper kingdoms.

The young woman was placed among a small number of burial shafts, tombs, and pit graves dating to the 18th dynasty (1550–1292 BCE).

Dr. Anna Stevens, from the Department of Archaeology at the University of Cambridge, said: “her burial is located at the Amarna North Desert Cemetery in the low desert west of the North Tombs. It includes a small number of burial shafts and tombs, as well as pit graves.”

A gold artifact found in Amarna in southern Egypt. Photo: Ministry of Tourism & Antiquities
A gold artifact found in Amarna in southern Egypt. Photo: Ministry of Tourism & Antiquities

She added a number of artifacts had been discovered and extensive restoration work conducted on various relics in the area.

Since 2005, the Amarna project has been researching the necropolis of Amarna, with ongoing excavations being supported by scientists from an archaeological mission at Tel El-Amarna that has been directed by the University of Cambridge since 1977.

Today, the city is home to a number of temples dedicated to Aten as well as several royal residences that continue to attract large crowds.

Ministry of Tourism and Antiquities

Cover Photo: Ministry of Tourism and Antiquities

Related Articles

According to researchers, the bones discovered underneath St. Peter’s Basilica may not be his

5 June 2021

5 June 2021

Three Italian researchers have voiced doubts about whether St. Peter’s bones are buried underneath the Rome basilica that bears his...

Archaeologists unearth human spines threaded onto reed posts in Peru

5 February 2022

5 February 2022

Archaeologists have found almost 192 examples of human vertebrae threaded onto reed posts 500 years ago in the Chincha Valley...

Ancient Latin texts written on papyrus reveal new information about the Roman world

11 January 2023

11 January 2023

Researchers funded by the European Union have deciphered ancient Latin texts written on papyrus. This work could reveal a lot...

2,700-year-old Children’s Cemetery unearthed in Turkey’s Tenedos

2 March 2024

2 March 2024

A 2700-year-old children’s cemetery was discovered during ongoing excavations in the ancient city of Tenedos in Bozcaada,  southeast of the...

Archaeologists reveal largest paleolithic cave art site in Eastern Iberia

17 September 2023

17 September 2023

More than 100 ancient paintings and engravings thought to be at least 24,000 years old were found in the cave...

Archaeologists discovered a sunken prehistoric fort in Clew Bay island

1 April 2024

1 April 2024

A sunken prehistoric fort has been discovered on Clew Bay island off the north Mayo coast, Ireland. It has been...

1,800-year-old Roman remains discovered in valley of eastern Turkey

21 February 2022

21 February 2022

Roman remains dating back 1800 years have been found in a valley in eastern Turkey. Among the Roman ruins found...

Dark secrets of Korea’s famous Wolseong palace complex are unearthed

8 September 2021

8 September 2021

The remains of an adult woman were discovered at the base of the Wolseong palace in Gyeongju, North Gyeongsang province,...

Ancient fish processing factories were discovered in ancient Roman city of Balsa, Portugal

18 July 2022

18 July 2022

In the Roman city of Balsa, one of the most important and symbolic archaeological sites in southern Portugal, archaeologists have...

A still life fresco discovered in new excavations of Pompeii Regio IX

28 June 2023

28 June 2023

Archaeologists excavating the ancient city of Pompeii have uncovered a gorgeous still-life fresco depicting a platter covered in food and...

Unique ancient Egyptian amulet seal discovered during archeological excavations in northern Turkey

11 November 2022

11 November 2022

During archaeological excavations in the ancient city of Amastris in the Amasra district of northern Turkey’s Bartın, an enchanted amulet...

Tanzania’s mysterious footprints were made by early humans, not bears

6 December 2021

6 December 2021

The prehistoric footprints discovered by archaeologists caused confusion because scientists looked at them again to determine whether they were left...

1900 years old funerary altar of a teenage girl discovered in Rome

9 May 2022

9 May 2022

A funerary altar indicating the location of the remains of Valeria, a 13-year-old girl who died in the 2nd century...

Ancient Hebrew “Incantation Bowls” discovered in a home in Israel

8 March 2022

8 March 2022

The Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA) said Monday that 1,500-year-old magical “incantation bowls” and other rare and ornate bone and ivory...

Archaeologists opened an untouched Etruscan tomb

31 October 2023

31 October 2023

In Vulci Archaeological Park, central Italy, a 2,600-year-old intact double-chambered Etruscan tomb that was discovered in April and had remained...