10 August 2022 The Future is the Product of the Past

Over 1,600-yr-old tomb of embracing lovers found in north China

Archaeologists recently published a study of the tomb of cuddling lovers, dating to the Northern Wei Dynasty (386-534), more than 1,600 years ago, according to Jilin University.

In 2020, the tomb was initially unearthed in Datong City, Shanxi Province, north China. The couple was buried in the same grave in a single casket. The man had his arms around his lover’s waist, while the female had her head on his shoulder and was cuddled against his chest. A silver ring was also discovered on her left hand’s ring finger, according to the researcher.

Further skeletal examination indicated that the male tomb owner’s right arm had an unhealed infected fracture, whereas the female’s bones looked to be healthy. This finding suggests that the two may have killed themselves.

Despite the fact that numerous graves of embracing couples from the Northern Wei Dynasty have previously been unearthed in China, the new archaeological finding of the well-preserved one is quite rare, according to the research team.

According to the researchers, such tombs assist better explain social conceptions of human life and death, as well as attitudes toward love, during that era, when the cohabitation of different ethnic groups drove the emergence and dissemination of pluralistic ethos.

Lovers hugging each other.
Lovers hugging each other.

The ancient Datong region was a significant melting pot for different cultures at the period, with the trend of yearning and cherishing love blossoming. During the time of the Northern Wei Dynasty in north China, the female tomb owner’s finger ring was mostly used as a symbol of love or marriage rather than for adornment.

Tombs of embracing lovers date back over 6,000 years, including the Lovers of Valdarno in Italy and the Embracing Skeletons of Alepotrypa in Greece.

Researchers from home and abroad, including those from Datong Institute of Archaeology, Jilin University, and Xiamen University, collaborated on research and studies on the recently discovered tomb in Shanxi. This study’s findings were published in the journal International Journal of Osteoarchaeology.

Cover Photo: Photo taken on Aug. 5, 2020 shows the tomb of lovers hugging each other dating back to the Northern Wei Dynasty (386-534) unearthed in Datong City, north China’s Shanxi Province. (Xinhua)

Banner
Related Post

Egyptian mission discovered five ancient water wells in North Sinai

1 March 2022

1 March 2022

A team of Egyptian archeologists working in the Tell El Kedwa discovered five ancient wells which are believed to be...

Venice of the Pacific: The mysterious Micronesian ruins of Nan Madol

12 July 2022

12 July 2022

Sometimes art and architecture challenge our perceptions of what was formerly thought to be feasible and what our forefathers were...

3 mummified skeletons were found in Iznik, western Turkey

8 October 2021

8 October 2021

Archaeologists discovered mummified skeletons dating from the 2nd century A.D. within two sarcophagi at the Hisardere Necropolis in Bursa’s Iznik...

Archaeologists have unearthed a flawless Roman blue glass bowl in the Dutch city of Nijmegen

23 January 2022

23 January 2022

Archaeologists excavating the site of a comprehensive housing and green space development in Nijmegen’s Winkelsteeg, one of the oldest cities...

The ancestors of many animal species alive today may have lived in a delta in what is now China, new research suggests

20 April 2022

20 April 2022

The ancestors of many animal species alive today may have lived in a delta in what is now China, new...

The inhabitants of Pınarbaşı Höyük in central Turkey may be the ancestors of the Boncuklu Höyük and Çatalhöyük neolithic human communities

27 July 2022

27 July 2022

The Department of Excavations and Researchs, which is affiliated with the Ministry of Culture of the Republic of Turkey, attracted...

Remains of a 5-year-old girl found under Real Alcázar in Spain

9 May 2021

9 May 2021

The body of a five-year-old fair-haired girl who lived in the late Middle Ages and was most likely of noble...

Vindolanda marks the 1900th anniversary of Hadrian’s Wall with an altar discovery

9 February 2022

9 February 2022

The excavation season hasn’t started yet, but the Vindolanda Roman fort has kicked off Hadrian’s Wall’s 1900th anniversary year with...

Unsolvable Megalithic Mystery of ancient Greek “Dragon Houses”

4 July 2022

4 July 2022

The Dragon Houses of Euboea, which probably dates to the Preclassical period of ancient Greece, are one of the historical...

Mothers in the prehistoric were far more skilled at parenting their children than we give them credit for

24 November 2021

24 November 2021

The death rate of newborns in ancient cultures is not a reflection of inadequate healthcare, sickness, or other issues, according...

Shackled skeleton identified as rare evidence of slavery found in Rutland

7 June 2021

7 June 2021

In Rutland, archaeologists discovered an ‘unusual’ skeleton of a Roman slave, who might have been a criminal sentenced to death....

The remains of a very uncommon’ dinosaur species have been discovered in Brazil

20 November 2021

20 November 2021

Researchers have uncovered the remains of a toothless, two-legged dinosaur species that lived 70 million years ago in Brazil, calling...

45,000 years ago, Neanderthals in the Swabian Jura used complex tool-making techniques

13 September 2021

13 September 2021

Findings that will change our perception of Neanderthals’ sophistication A team from the University of Tübingen have proved that Middle...

Archaeologists find the earliest evidence Maya sacred calendar in the Guatemalan pyramid

14 April 2022

14 April 2022

Archaeologists identified two plaster fragments depicting a date that the Maya civilization called ‘7 deer’ and was part of the...

A Roman sarcophagus containing two skeletons was found in Bath, England

29 June 2021

29 June 2021

Stone walls, a Roman sarcophagus, and a cremation burial have been unearthed in a renovation project at the Bathwick Roman...

Comments
Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.